What to watch in April 2022: The best movies, shows and music videos

Long before he was the Oscar-nominated director behind movies like girl interrupted and Ford versus FerrariJames Mangold was studying for his MFA at Columbia University film school while developing his first feature film, Heavy. Released in 1995, it’s a moody mumblecore drama that has nothing to do with the rest of Mangold’s catalog. It follows Victor, an overweight thirtysomething cook, played by prominent actor Pruitt Taylor Vince, as he misses his family’s greasy spoon clock. When the restaurant hires a lowly college dropout named Callie (Liv Tyler) to wait tables, Victor immediately falls in love with her but finds himself crippled by self-doubt, hated by his uptight musician boyfriend Jeff (Evan Dando), and teased by the cynical longtime waitress Delores (Debbie Harry). Heavy could easily sound like an ode to rural incel, but a dispirited, minimalist score by Thurston Moore steers the film in a different direction.

Over the entire film, passages of distant drones, dreary guitar strums and detuned piano notes that ooze static misery hang. It’s a haunting combination that speaks volumes for the otherwise quiet Victor. Heavy is a quiet film that captures what it’s like to be hopelessly in love with someone, but more importantly, Moore’s score captures the relentless loneliness of life as a city dweller, where every path to take seems to be deadlock. –Nina Corcoran

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better things let that motherfucker burn

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Currently in the midst of its fifth and final season, Pamela Adlon’s beautifully lived comedy-drama better things continues to host the most varied and personalized soundtrack on television. The semi-autobiographical show, which follows Adlon’s character, Sam and his three daughters as they bicker, joke and grow up in the Southern California sun, is allergic to anything obvious or overly sentimental. , and his music does the same. Each half-hour episode is jam-packed with songs, and they’re often so particular that you just know Adlon, an outspoken music fanatic, helped choose them herself, likely after much internal deliberation. The season premiere alone includes everything from a little-known ’60s blues ditty to a singsong French tune that Wes Anderson longs for to Monty Python’s “Galaxy Song.” But the episode’s most surprising and surprisingly effective synchronization comes at the end.

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