Feminist Pornography – Korsan Izle http://korsanizle.com/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 06:55:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://korsanizle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Feminist Pornography – Korsan Izle http://korsanizle.com/ 32 32 The pornographic roots of gender ideology https://korsanizle.com/the-pornographic-roots-of-gender-ideology/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:04:03 +0000 https://korsanizle.com/the-pornographic-roots-of-gender-ideology/ Do you remember that Canadian transgender teacher with giant prosthetic breasts? Kayla Lemieux’s attempt to identify as a woman struck many as absurd, if not downright obscene. The large breasts, with vast protruding nipples, portrayed a pornified version of femininity. According to feminist writer Geneviève Gluck, this sexualized view of female identity, while extreme, is […]]]>

Do you remember that Canadian transgender teacher with giant prosthetic breasts? Kayla Lemieux’s attempt to identify as a woman struck many as absurd, if not downright obscene. The large breasts, with vast protruding nipples, portrayed a pornified version of femininity. According to feminist writer Geneviève Gluck, this sexualized view of female identity, while extreme, is not entirely unique to Lemieux. Geneviève is co-founder of Reduxx magazine, a feminist project that documents the worst excesses of the trans movement. For her, the link between gender extremism and extreme pornography is clear. She joined Brendan O’Neill on the latest episode of his podcast, The Brendan O’Neill Show. The following is an edited excerpt from their conversation. Listen to the full episode here.

Brendan O’Neill: What role do you think pornography has played in transforming femininity into something everyone can relate to?

Genevieve Gluck: A lot of it starts with the sexualization of surgery, which has really crossed over into the porn industry with things like breast implants. Within these procedures in pornography, we see the exacerbation and objectification of certain aspects of the body, and the sexualization of body modification itself. Whether it’s breasts, buttocks, labia, or whatever else you’re trying to show off, it all points to a fetishization of certain body parts.

Pornography is now normalized in the private sphere. Many of the concepts or ideas about women that you see coming from trans activists – their objectification of women, or their reduction of femininity to plastic surgery and hormones – have a connection to pornography. We do not yet fully understand the extent of the problem. I don’t even think that’s possible, because we don’t see it in the public sphere. All we see are the repercussions of this porn saturated culture.

I strongly suspect that a lot of people pushing the line that women can have penises are watching some type of porn. I know that can be a controversial thing to say. But I think it certainly shapes a lot of behaviors and influences how society views women.

O’Neill: How do you think the industrialization of pornography impacts discussions around gender identity?

Gluck: A good example is the term “front hole”. The first time I saw it was in 2016, when the Human Rights Campaign recommended it as terminology in a guide called “Safer Sex for Trans Bodies.” Most people don’t tend to think too deeply about this stuff or recognize the influence of porn. But in the “female-to-male” (FTM) genre of trans pornography, the anatomy of the trans person is referred to as the front hole, and this is done because it is a clear reference to the anus. It is to define the anatomy of the woman by reference to sexual receptivity. It is simply amazing that this is recommended terminology to apply to all women.

There’s a trans writer, Andrea Long Chu, who has written extensively about something called “sissy porn,” which he says made him trans. In his writings, he again reduces women to their sexual receptivity. He said that pornography is “a quintessential expression of femininity” and that the “essential” of women is “a waiting asshole and empty, empty eyes”. These are things found in the pornographic genre of forced feminization, also sometimes called “sissification,” where the man is ostensibly forced, but is actually a willing participant, to be feminized. He will be dressed in lingerie, forced to wear make-up, then undergo the ultimate act of forced feminization, which is penetration.

O’Neill: Many of the most well-known men who identify as women often change their bodies to reflect a very specific view of femininity – for example, massive breasts, long hair and pouty lips. Does this have an effect on how girls growing up conceive of themselves?

Gluck: Certainly. Some girls who have detransitioned said it was what prompted them to transition. Girls are presented with this idea of ​​what a woman is by men who objectify themselves and alter their bodies in extreme, hypersexualized ways. And these men are applauded and celebrated. They are presented as role models for young people. The girls will then internalize this particular vision of femininity.

Not only are girls today exposed to pornography at such a young age, but they also have men on social media platforms telling them that it is their destiny. Not only are they expected to become something objectifiable, but they are also assumed to like to be objectified. It’s no wonder so many girls feel disassociated from their bodies when presented with this image of femininity, especially if they’re already struggling with puberty. It’s hard to recognize your own body as a woman if it doesn’t look like the artificial version of a woman you’re being shown.

O’Neill: What impact has this had on young people who may identify as gay or lesbian as adults? There seems to be a real problem here where many transitioning youth have been bullied homophobicly, or just didn’t want that identity because it’s no longer cool to be exclusively same-sex attracted.

Gluck: Absolutely, there is a problem, especially for lesbian girls. I saw someone say that lesbians weren’t an identity or a person anymore, it was a porn genre. I think it’s relevant here again. Lesbian women have become so objectified that many may now want to escape or may not even be able to recognize their own sexuality. Homophobia is very real, it is a very strong current. There’s something going on there that I guess is different for young girls than it is for boys and for young men, so I can’t speak specifically to boys. But for lesbian girls in particular, it comes down to the difficulty of growing up as a girl and then struggling with her sexuality on top of that.

Trans activists also tell lesbians that they have to accept male partners, which is just the most extreme form of homophobia. The concept of the “lesbian penis” is imposed on women. Some transgender women use the phrase “cotton ceiling,” which refers to lesbian women’s underwear as the barrier these men are meant to conquer and cross. It’s horrible. Thank goodness there are groups working to bring the homophobic aspects of this movement to light. I just wished more people would see the trans ideology for homophobia and for sexism than it really is.

Geneviève Gluck was talking to Brendan O’Neill on the latest episode of The Brendan O’Neill Show. Listen to the full conversation here:

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Sex worker lawyer Carol Leigh dies :: Bay Area Reporter https://korsanizle.com/sex-worker-lawyer-carol-leigh-dies-bay-area-reporter/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 18:15:48 +0000 https://korsanizle.com/sex-worker-lawyer-carol-leigh-dies-bay-area-reporter/ Carol Leigh, an activist bisexual sex worker and artist also known as Scarlot Harlot, died Nov. 19 at her San Francisco home after a long battle with cancer. She was 71 years old. An advocate for the decriminalization of prostitution, he is credited with coining the term “sex work”. “Carol Leigh was the sexy red-haired […]]]>

Carol Leigh, an activist bisexual sex worker and artist also known as Scarlot Harlot, died Nov. 19 at her San Francisco home after a long battle with cancer. She was 71 years old. An advocate for the decriminalization of prostitution, he is credited with coining the term “sex work”.

“Carol Leigh was the sexy red-haired prostitute with a heart of gold, soul of an artist-poet and brain of a scholar,” Annie Sprinkle, an entertainer, former sex worker and friend of Ms Leigh, told more than four decades. “She knew more than anyone about sex worker issues, and she inspired and empowered legions of sex workers around the world who continue to carry her torch.”

Carol Queen, author, sex educator and co-director of the Center for Sex and Culture, also commented on Ms Leigh’s legacy.

“Carol knew everyone, connected people whenever possible, saw the big picture, was a fierce feminist and a gentle soul with the biggest heart,” Queen said. “She’s just standing there with Margo St. James as another driving force behind the sex worker organization, and I just don’t think it’s possible to overstate the space she’s made for we.”

Ms Leigh, who chose her name as an adult and kept her first name a secret, was born in New York on January 11, 1951 and raised in Jackson Heights, Queens, by parents she once described as “disenchanted ex-socialists”. She later said, “I grew up with three knocks against me: I was poor, I was tall, and I was smart.”

A self-described “flowery hippie”, Ms Leigh attended Suffolk Community College, Empire State College and Boston University’s creative writing program, where she studied with poet Anne Sexton shortly after. long before his death by suicide. While in college, she became a feminist and started a women’s writing group that included both a stripper and an anti-porn activist.

After moving to San Francisco in 1977, Ms Leigh took a job at the Hong Kong massage parlor on O’Farrell Street. She soon joined COYOTE (Call Off Your Old Tired Ethics), the first advocacy group for sex workers in the United States, founded by St. James, whom Ms Leigh first met when her mother invited St. James to speak in a national organization. for the women’s meeting. (St. James passed away in January 2021.)

Ms Leigh later said she did not feel exploited by voluntary sex transactions with clients, but when she was raped by two men at the sex parlor where she worked she was unable to report the crime to the police because prostitution was criminalized and she feared the business would be shut down.

Ms Leigh found herself embroiled in the feminist ‘sex wars’ of the 1970s and 1980s. As described in Jill Nagle’s 1997 anthology ‘Whores and Other Feminists’, while attending a conference organized by Women Against Violence in Pornography and Media, she suggested that a panel on “the sex use industry” be renamed “the sex work industry”. coining a phrase that has become widely used as an umbrella term for all types of sex and erotic work.

AIDS activism and the rights of sex workers

As the AIDS crisis exploded in the 1980s, Ms Leigh intended to move to Texas, thinking she could educate people less aware of the threat, but her car broke down in Arizona and she ended up by living in Tucson for two years.

Back in San Francisco, she joined Citizens for Medical Justice, which later became ACT UP/San Francisco. She has advocated for safer sex, opposed mandatory HIV testing for prostitutes, volunteered for Prevention Point’s needle exchange, and raised awareness among prostitutes working on the streets. She was among hundreds of activists arrested during the week of action around the Sixth International AIDS Conference in San Francisco. In 2017, she described those years in a video for the GLBT Historical Society’s San Francisco Oral History Project ACT UP.

“Carol was the fairy godmother of San Francisco’s early AIDS direct action groups. She was a character, always injecting an element of over-the-top satire into our protests and deliberations, with a devilish smile and wink in eyes. His sex-positive messages about safer sex were way ahead of their time and were an explosion of fun amid all the pessimism,” recalled the former ACT UP/SF member and longtime activist. LGBTQ community date, Terry Beswick. “But she was also very serious about her causes. It was not always easy to make us care about the rights of prostitutes and prisoners when so many of us were dying on the streets of the Castro, but she really loved our boys who were dying, and we loved him back.”

Over the years, Ms Leigh has often been seen doing political street theater and civil disobedience, collaborating with artist-activists such as the late Rainbow Flag co-creator Gilbert Baker and the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence.

“Gilbert designed a number of costumes for Carol Leigh’s drag character, Scarlot Harlot, and they frequently collaborated on all sorts of outrageous shenanigans. I also remember her sitting at the kitchen table in the drag dealer Dennis Peron pots on 17th Street, regaling us with intimate details of various elected officials’ flaws,” longtime gay activist Cleve Jones told the Bay Area Reporter. “I hope she will be remembered as a true trailblazer. in the effort to decriminalize, destigmatize and advocate for sex workers.” (Peron died in 2018.)

In 1990, Ms. Leigh co-founded BAYSWAN, the Bay Area Sex Worker Advocacy Network. The group supported the Exotic Dancers Alliance, which organized better working conditions for strippers, and helped establish St. James’s Infirmary, the first directed occupational health and safety clinic. by and for sex workers. She later helped launch the Sex Worker Awareness Project in 2003 and worked with Queen and her partner Robert Lawrence to create the Center for Sex and Culture.

In the mid-1990s, Ms Leigh was among the leaders of the San Francisco Task Force on Prostitution, which released a report supporting the decriminalization of sex work. A decade later, she helped organize decriminalization campaigns in Berkeley and San Francisco. Although these were not passed, they laid the groundwork for state laws that prohibit sex workers from being arrested when they report crimes and prevent police from arresting people for vagrancy at home. purposes of prostitution.

Ms Leigh was an accomplished artist, writer and filmmaker. Her early 1980s solo show, “The Adventures of Scarlot Harlot”, advocated for the inclusion of sex workers in the feminist movement. She wrote a chapter in Frédérique Delacoste and Priscilla Alexander’s classic 1987 anthology “Sex Work: Writings by Women in the Sex Industry.” His own book “Unrepentant Whore: The Collected Works of Scarlot Harlot” was published in 2004.

“For me, as a peep show teenager, learning about Carol Leigh’s writing and activism was an eye opener,” author Lily Burana told BAR. “Her work, always centered on the needs and perspectives of sex workers, has helped me feel less alone.”

Ms. Leigh has directed and produced films and videos, including feminist erotica for House O’Chicks, collaborations with Sprinkle and Joseph Kramer, and the documentary “Blind Eye to Justice: HIV+ Women in California Prisons”, narrated by black lesbian activist Angela Davis. She has received awards from the American Film Institute for videos such as “Outlaw Poverty, Not Prostitutes” and “Yes Means Yes. No Means No”. She launched the San Francisco Sex Worker Film and Arts Festival in 1999.

Openly bisexual, Ms Leigh had relationships with both men and women, but she did not marry or start a household with a partner. After Ms Leigh was diagnosed with cancer, she moved in with her mother, Augusta – also a feminist and artist – who died this summer aged 100.

In her final months, Ms Leigh set up a trust, funded by her and her mother’s savings, to benefit sex worker friends and activists; did a final video interview with Sprinkle and his wife, UC Santa Cruz art professor Beth Stephens; and prepared her archives for donation to the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at Harvard University.

Ms. Leigh is survived by her brother, Phillip, and many friends and admirers around the world. Plans for a memorial service will be announced when finalized.

Help keep the Bay Area Reporter going during these trying times. To support local, independent, and LGBTQ journalism, consider becoming a BAR member.

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Incels are the new shock troops | Victoria Smith https://korsanizle.com/incels-are-the-new-shock-troops-victoria-smith/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 00:26:27 +0000 https://korsanizle.com/incels-are-the-new-shock-troops-victoria-smith/ Iin the years 1975 against our willSusan Brownmiller describes the rapists as ‘front line male shock troops, terrorist guerrillas in the longest sustained battle the world has ever seen”. She does not mean by this that all men are rapists; She means they or they don’t have be: A world without rapists would be a […]]]>

Iin the years 1975 against our willSusan Brownmiller describes the rapists as ‘front line male shock troops, terrorist guerrillas in the longest sustained battle the world has ever seen”. She does not mean by this that all men are rapists; She means they or they don’t have be:

A world without rapists would be a world in which women move freely without being afraid of men. That some violent men constitute enough of a threat to keep all women in a constant state of intimidation.

Other men may find rape abhorrent; they or they may nevertheless take for granted the spoils of female fear. They get used to women not being able to move freely, speak freely, create spaces for themselvessee. Without knowing, they or they can find “a constant state of intimidation” just the thing to keep women around their to rise above themselvessee.

Almost half acwalk iny after Brownmiller wrote, a Guardian the title warns that “experts fear the growing global ‘incel’ culture is fueling terrorism”. The incel – a kind of über-misogynist, largely confined to online “dark” communities, occasionally emerging to commit acts of extreme violence — took the place of the standard rapist as the figure all women fear and all good men condemn.

It positions itself as a toxic mutation of “normal” masculinity, a radicalized and brainwashed virgin caught in “a world of loneliness, isolation and extreme misogyny”. Reports such as “The State of Britain’s Boys” suggest that the way to steer young men away from this trap is to help their see the benefits of feminism.

“Instead of feminism harming boys“, writes Laura Bates“the report found that the opposite is true: addressing male violence and misogyny, encouraging different types of masculinity, and seeing women as allies all contribute to better mental health and better education among the boys..”

As a mother of three sons, I am obviously in favor of anything that liberates their corrosive effects of male socialization. Still, I can’t help but feel that there’s something missing in the tales of incel culture, toxic masculinity, and misguided young men.

They are not so much fighting sexism as running a good cop/bad cop protection racket

As with Brownmiller’s non-rapists, I’m not convinced that “normal” men – no matter how “anti-incel” they are their stance — are ready for a world in which female submission is not the norm. They may wish to change things they or they say and do in order to attain such submission; they or they might just be tired of playing tough man. Still, many years of dealing with so-called “feminist” men have convinced me that very few are willing to accept the central premise that incels rage against: that women could say “no” to you, potentially for your entire life, for no reason other than women are the people in their own right.

This, after all, is the end point of feminism. It is not a people’s liberation movement in general. It offers possibilities of humanization for men, but this is not its main objective. Telling boys like my sons there’s no cost to their to recognize the full humanity of women – unless they are chess, such as incels, they or they will never feel left out – we assure men that women’s emotional, sexual and reproductive services will always be there for the taking. It’s not just incels who can’t accept anything less. Scratch the surface and you might find a surprisingly large number of men.

Witness, for example, the way in which men on the left and on the right compete to demonstrate which of the they have women’s best interests at heart. So much time is spent pointing fingers at those other men out thereand to declare their “the patriarchy”. They are not so much fighting sexism as waging a good cop/bad cop protection racket where each group benefits from the misdeeds of the other.

One group of men attack abortion rights, then another group tells us if we’re not supporting commercial sex or commercial surrogacy – “her body, her choice!” – we are only going have ourselves to blame if we completely lose the choice to procreate. Meanwhile, anti-abortion have no qualms about telling us that unless we accept a forced pregnancy, we can say goodbye to women-only spaces, women’s sports and any acknowledgment of the existence of the female body.

Neither group really challenges the other; they are capitalizing on each other’s extremism. The are times when it looks like a behind-the-scenes deal. They give each other leverage in an endless cycle of exploitation. As Andrea Dworkin said“if you let their distract you with public cockfighting they or theyyou always, you miss the fact that when it comes to producing the social product called pornography, they or they I agree”.

In men who hate womenBates argues that “underlying the manosphere and white supremacist communities is a shared belief that the fundamental and sacred purpose of man is to have sex, procreation and domination”. She worries that incel ideas “are starting to worm their your way through the different communities of the manosphere and have a blast in the lives of real peoples”.

I think that’s seeing things upside down. The belief that men have the right to use women’s bodies in any way they or they willingly is not a niche — it’s the norm. The incel culture is just one manifestation of this. Right-wing traditionalism is another, but so is the way “progressive” men position access to prostituted women and surrogate mothers as a human right.

If we are let’s call it terrorism let’s include it all

Have more socially acceptable ways to express your right to female bodies – because you will use the traditions of your communityWhere can find a way to pay for what you need — doesn’t make you a feminist. As long as you believe that access to these organs is your right, you are just a missed incel.

As a feminist who believes that biological sex exists, I have met many incel style languagealthough from people who have been better at supervising their grievances against the wife. I’m no longer shocked that women are told they or they should be raped to deathWhere locked in breeding pens. Nor am I surprised at all the nice, normal men who, in debates about self-identification in shelters and prisons, believe in validating male feelings. are worth a few more rapes.

These men will say they or they hate incels, tell feminists they or theyare the ones we should fight (as if ending male violence were women’s work, men themselvesves as project managers). But the vast majority of male violence against women is not committed by incels. Most women who die at the hands of men do not die at the hands of fully paid members of the manosphere. If we are let’s call it terrorism let’s include it alland include all the rhetoric that feeds it.

Future men like my sons can be encouraged to cry, to play with dolls, to reject all superficial and uncool trappings of “toxic masculinity”.”. However, too often I see men who push for this change remain unable to interact with women as if we are there moral and intellectual equals. Theyare happy to smash the patriarchy to the extent it constrains them, but don’t understand why they or they still comes up against the brick wall of independent female subjectivity. Why, they or they ask, can’t this be theirs to disassemble, too?

A world without incels – a world without rapists – would be a world in which men have deal more and more with the complete, impermeable and exclusive personality of women. I think it would be a better world for everyone, but it will never see the light of day if we keep lying about the cost. In the meantime, those who profit from the “constant state of intimidation” of women must recognize their complicity in its realization.

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‘My Devilish Delight’ – Sarah Waters on Her Heartbreaking and Salacious Fingersmith Classic | Books https://korsanizle.com/my-devilish-delight-sarah-waters-on-her-heartbreaking-and-salacious-fingersmith-classic-books/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 16:36:00 +0000 https://korsanizle.com/my-devilish-delight-sarah-waters-on-her-heartbreaking-and-salacious-fingersmith-classic-books/ Fingersmith was my third novel, after Tipping the Velvet and Affinity. It shares their 19th century setting, but it was inspired by two particular Victorian worlds. The first was that of working-class life as reflected in the interviews conducted by journalist Henry Mayhew for his brilliantly evocative book London Labor and the London Poor; the […]]]>

Fingersmith was my third novel, after Tipping the Velvet and Affinity. It shares their 19th century setting, but it was inspired by two particular Victorian worlds. The first was that of working-class life as reflected in the interviews conducted by journalist Henry Mayhew for his brilliantly evocative book London Labor and the London Poor; the second was that of “sensational” fiction, the successful genre established in the 1860s by novelists such as Wilkie Collins and Mary Elizabeth Braddon, whose tales of gothic melodrama reveled in themes of domestic violence, secrets and lost and shifting identities.

What appealed to me about these worlds is the place they give to marginalized voices, the way they challenge our stereotypes of Victorian kindness. Those interviewed by Mayhew include peddlers, vagabonds, orphaned children: characters on the fringes of mainstream culture but with a complex culture of their own. The sensational novel is swarming with “ladies in peril”, vulnerable women and girls who are victims on a large scale. But it’s also full of female protagonists who are con artists and schemers in their own right – women who are glorious transgressors of social norms. I decided to bring these two worlds together in a way that I hoped would pay homage to them.

In fact, the tribute extended to a bit of looting: my starting point was to “borrow” a wonderful twist from Collins’s Woman in White. With that in place, my task became to think back, work out my characters and their involvement in the scam, decide who could win what and why. The resulting plot sees ‘baby farmer’ Mrs Sucksby send her adopted daughter Sue to work as a maid for a lonely heiress – and persuade her to marry a crook, who then intends to lock her up in a crazy’s house.

Well, in true tabloid style, it all gets a bit dizzying, and there were times when even I struggled to keep up with the complications. Looking back now on my research, I find detailed notes on Victorian criminal life, as well as page after page of juicy street vocabulary. My title comes from Eric Partridge’s A Dictionary of Historical Slang: “Finger-smith. A Midwife: C.19-20; down. 2. a thief, a pickpocket.

Deliciously good… The Handmaiden by Park Chan-wook transports the story to Japanese-occupied Korea in the 1930s. Photo: Moho Film/Allstar

But I also find various inheritance scenarios tested as flowcharts. I see key decisions being made and debated: “Perhaps M is Mrs. S’s own daughter??” “Maybe R could be killed, + Mrs Sucksby hanged for that?” And I find a few things that surprise me: ideas for a sexual encounter between Sue and the villain of the novel; the possibility that Maud, my heiress, ends up on the gallows herself. Most unexpectedly of all, I see I flirted with the idea of ​​Sue and Maud being twins, separated at birth. I have no recollection of it – and I can’t, I think, have entertained the idea for very long.

Because Sue and Maud’s mutual fall in love forms Fingersmith’s joyous and disruptive heart: it’s the emotional entanglement that fuels my plot, even as it spoils Mrs. Sucksby’s. It is also central to the novel’s feminist agenda. Maud’s abusive guardian, Mr. Lilly, was inspired by The Woman in White’s selfish art-collecting uncle, Mr. Fairlie. His literary project, however, is based on that of Henry Spencer Ashbee, a Victorian bibliophile who in the 1870s and 80s privately published three huge indexes of pornographic books.

Porn was a thriving industry in the 19th century, dominated by men. Her images are replete with scenes of female intimacy, but all were constructed largely with male viewers in mind. And yet, for someone like me, who searches the past for evidence of homosexual lives and only finds clues, fragments and gaps in mainstream sources, this male author pornography has always been strangely Attractive: This is the only realm of Victorian representation where you are guaranteed to find lesbians having a good time. As I put on Fingersmith together, I began to wonder what it would be like to portray 19th century women enjoying pornography in their own way – say, extracting queer content from a larger narrative, then discarding the rest.

So as diligently as I wrote down my list of historical slang terms and did my research on robbers’ kitchens, asylums and everything else, I made frequent trips to the British Library to read pornography. old and copy lesbian tracks. (Rather satisfyingly, many came from Ashbee’s personal collection, which he bequeathed to the British Museum along with his most respectable books.)

For a time I had planned for Maud to piece together a piecemeal text from smuggled excerpts from her uncle’s volumes. It never made it to the final cut, but the idea of ​​a lesbian plunder of texts by male authors remained crucial to my vision of the book as a whole. When Maud asks Sue to explain “what a woman should do, on her wedding night”, she stages an encounter that comes, curtly, straight from the pages of classic porn – then she is undone by the physique and emotional reality of it. The ending of the novel, which sees her making a living by writing pornography herself, shows her playing men at their own game – or perhaps even beating them, forging a kind of female eroticism that is freed from patriarchal control.

“The subjects are serious – but oh, what fun I had!” …Sarah Waters. Photograph: Teri Pengilley/The Guardian

Pornography, baby farming, childhood trauma, asylum racketeering… the topics are serious, but, oh, what fun I had. That’s what I remember most about the writing process: the joy, the devilish joy, the speed and the blissful intensity with which I worked. I also vividly remember giving the manuscript to its first reader and then, from an adjoining room, hearing her cry as she reached the end of the first part, a mixture of shock and indignation at having been so surprised. Could there be a happier sound for an author?

From the start, in fact, the reception of the book has been exciting. In 2002, the year of its publication, it was shortlisted for the Orange Prize and the Booker. He received a historic dagger from the Crime Writers Association and – one of my favorite honors – won the Children of the Night award from the Dracula Society, for which I was presented with a handmade model tombstone with two little babies swaddled at the foot. Soon I started getting letters from readers who found the story so inspiring that they drew pictures of its heroines, based fanfiction on it, took phrases and images, and turned them into tattoos. Around the same time, I saw the book promoted in WH Smith as “The Perfect Mother’s Day Gift”.

The new edition of Fingersmith.
The new edition of Fingersmith. Photography: Little Brown

finger cot is a novel, in other words, that seems to have appealed to all sorts of people – though, like Tipping the Velvet, as a coming-of-age story about female empowerment, it may have be spoken more intimately to young women. This please me a lot. I’ve never reread it cover to cover and I suspect that if I did, I’d give it some serious trim. But I still consider it the novel that I found my feet in as an author, and when I skim through it now, I love it immensely. I still think it’s a cracked story; there are jokes that still make me laugh. It has also, very flatteringly, had terrific reincarnations, first as a BBC TV version, starring Sally Hawkins and Elaine Cassidy in a beautiful combination as Sue and Maud; then in an excellent US stage adaptation by Alexa Junge; and, most recently, in the form of Park Chan-wook’s deliriously good The Handmaiden, in which the characters and plot are transported to Japanese-occupied Korea in the 1930s.

With Fingersmith, I finally scratched my Victorian itch. I moved on with my next book, The Night Watch, to the 1940s, and my novels have remained in the 20th century ever since. But if I had to keep one of my books for posterity, this is probably the one I would choose. Partly because I had so much fun with him, partly because he has returned so much to me over the years, in the form of the warmth that has been expressed for him by so many of his readers, but also because succeeds quite well, I think, in doing things that I’ve tried to do throughout my career: extracting characters from established narratives and allowing them to reproduce and mingle and go in new directions .

It is above all a novel which celebrates the pleasures of ground: storytelling, reading stories and pinching stories. Like all my books, it looks to the past, but it is really, I hope, about how, by imagining alternative histories, we can, with courage and malice, begin to rethink the present and the coming.

This is an edited excerpt from the afterword to the 20th anniversary edition of Fingersmith by Sarah Waters, published by Virago on November 17.

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Overweight Guy Just Won a Miss America Beauty Pageant https://korsanizle.com/overweight-guy-just-won-a-miss-america-beauty-pageant/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 14:57:47 +0000 https://korsanizle.com/overweight-guy-just-won-a-miss-america-beauty-pageant/ Did you know that men’s legs, which tend to have better muscle definition than women’s, are often used to advertise stockings? It seems that men sometimes make the best women. Further proof of that came this week when a 19-year-old guy named Brían was crowned ‘Miss Greater Derry’ in a Miss America beauty pageant. Looking […]]]>

Did you know that men’s legs, which tend to have better muscle definition than women’s, are often used to advertise stockings? It seems that men sometimes make the best women. Further proof of that came this week when a 19-year-old guy named Brían was crowned ‘Miss Greater Derry’ in a Miss America beauty pageant. Looking at the photos, you could be forgiven for thinking it was a social media hoax. One of his wives, say, in bulk would have been laughed offstage.

However, with well-groomed smiles, the losing contestants cooed as the overweight teenager knelt down so that a delicate rhinestone tiara could be placed on her head. After the coronation, Brían did not deliver the typical beauty queen speech calling for an end to war or cruelty to animals. Instead, he took to Instagram to brag about becoming “the FIRST transgender woman to hold the local Miss America title” in the pageant’s nearly 100-year history.

Ordinarily, I would refrain from making personal comments about the appearance of a teenager of either gender. And as a middle-aged, slowly sagging dwarf with a sense of fashion that would put a home-schooled child to shame, I am well aware that I have never been and never will be beauty pageant material. . But beauty queens are usually judged, at least in part, on their looks. It’s part of the deal. So you can’t help but notice that the winner of this particular contest looks strikingly like an undercooked, lumpy sausage, with his meaty moobs squashed into a dress.

In a world where online pornography is a click away and women in Iran are being killed for removing their headscarves, I find it hard to muster too much fury against the kitschy sexism of beauty pageants. The idea of ​​women and girls parading while sweaty-handed judges mark them is certainly chilling and anachronistic. Nonetheless, the women entered the Miss Greater Derry pageant in good faith and deserved a fair chance. They were denied a prize that rightfully belonged to one of them. Brían flew away not only with the tiara, but also with a college scholarship and sponsorship opportunities. The other contestants had no choice but to applaud at the mockery made of their efforts. The show served as a powerful reminder that, in today’s America, failing to show deference to trans overlords (or trans overladies?) is potentially career-ending.

This pattern is reproduced in public life. From sports to politics to science, wherever programs are set up to increase women’s participation, authorized men in stiletto heels parade to mark them as their territory. And if ever proof was needed that trans women are men, it can be seen in the flattering and gushing behavior towards them the world over. Overweight women are not entered into beauty contests at all, let alone crowned.

Of course, some men have long been fascinated by the sight of beautiful women competing with each other. Before becoming President of the United States, Donald Trump was a co-owner of the Miss Universe franchise. Earlier this month, Thailand’s first billionaire – a transgender media mogul called Jakkaphong ‘Anne’ Jakrajutatip – bought the company for $20 million. The 43-year-old has already won awards and accolades for successful women, and was widely celebrated as the competition’s first “female” owner.

In the United States, an unlikely alliance is leading the fight against this trans takeover of beauty pageants. In a comical twist, the American feminist organization Women’s Liberation Front (WoLF) has been at the forefront of protecting women’s rights to become beauty queens. Last month, the radical women’s group won a legal battle alongside Miss America USA (MUSA). A potential candidate – a man who identified as trans – has filed a lawsuit against MUSA, after his application was rejected on the grounds that he is not a “woman by birth”.

As WoLF President Lierre Keith tells me, “You may roll your eyes at the fact that this is a beauty pageant, but the principle is the same whether it’s a contest, a homeless shelter, a hospital or a prison. Women say no to men, as we have the right to. These are “men pretending to be women and claiming a right to our spaces,” she says. The idea that femininity is a costume that can be put on by men is the essence of the right to swing the dick.

Much to the chagrin of proudly hairy feminists like myself, there are probably more Miss America fans and aspiring contestants than there are critics who rage at the patriarchal beauty standards these pageants promote. Given this, the silver lining of tall men like Brían waltzing around and snatching up women’s awards is that more women will be forced to put aside political differences and recognize what unites us. The threat trans ideology poses to women’s spaces and opportunities could hardly be clearer. So, I’d like to say a heartfelt ‘bravo’ to Miss Greater Derry – she just might end up inspiring women all over the world. But not in the way he imagined.

Joe Bartosch is a journalist who campaigns for the rights of women and girls.

To inquire about reposting dopecontent, a right of reply or a request for correction, please contact the editor, Viv Regan.

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Letter: Regarding Froma Harrop’s recent Herald column – Grand Forks Herald https://korsanizle.com/letter-regarding-froma-harrops-recent-herald-column-grand-forks-herald/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://korsanizle.com/letter-regarding-froma-harrops-recent-herald-column-grand-forks-herald/ National columnist Froma Harrop said in the Herald on Sunday: “The republic will outlive the drag queens. It’s not a bad question, though. Is that okay? For answers, one might look to the 1930s work of Oxford University anthropologist JD Unwin. He looked at 86 widely varying civilizations and found that when sexual hedonism invaded […]]]>

National columnist Froma Harrop said in the Herald on Sunday: “The republic will outlive the drag queens.

It’s not a bad question, though. Is that okay?

For answers, one might look to the 1930s work of Oxford University anthropologist JD Unwin. He looked at 86 widely varying civilizations and found that when sexual hedonism invaded a nation, a type of “human entropy” led to a gradual descent into disorder and collapse in as little as three generations.

A better question, however, might be why a sector of the population is so desperate to trivialize and mainstream drag culture and why is there such an unsubtle attempt to bring children into this world of voyeurism? against nature ? It doesn’t seem any different from the almost savage reaction of some Floridians when a measure was on the table to delay sex education in that state until after third grade. Why, one might ask, should the third year (eight years) be considered too late – and too late for what? What about the introduction of sexual content at younger and younger ages that energizes a segment of the population so much? I would say it has its roots in the dark works of John Money and Claude Migeon, which you can read for yourself if you have the stomach for it.

For the concerned citizen, I would refer readers to the contemporary writings of feminist Geneviève Gluck at Reduxx, who carefully addressed the dark goals of the drag queen phenomenon and the publicly indisputable advance of transgenderism, which winds up through pornography, l integration of pedophilia, and the objectification of women in these performances by reducing them to a multitude of sexual stereotypes.

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Russia: Parliament votes to ban the promotion of LGBTIQ relationships https://korsanizle.com/russia-parliament-votes-to-ban-the-promotion-of-lgbtiq-relationships/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 00:49:04 +0000 https://korsanizle.com/russia-parliament-votes-to-ban-the-promotion-of-lgbtiq-relationships/ The lower house of the Russian parliament, the State Duma, adopted on October 27 in first reading a bill prohibiting the promotion of “non-traditional sexual relations”. None of the 400 deputies opposed it. State Duma Speaker Vyacheslav Volodin, of President Vladimir Putin’s United Russia (UR) party, said: “We must do everything to protect our children […]]]>

The lower house of the Russian parliament, the State Duma, adopted on October 27 in first reading a bill prohibiting the promotion of “non-traditional sexual relations”. None of the 400 deputies opposed it.

State Duma Speaker Vyacheslav Volodin, of President Vladimir Putin’s United Russia (UR) party, said: “We must do everything to protect our children and those who want to live a normal life. Everything else is sin, sodomy, darkness, and our country is fighting against it.”

Linking the legislation to Russia’s “special military operation” in Ukraine, he added: “We must protect our citizens and Russia from degradation and extinction, from the darkness spread by the United States and European states”.

Volodin has promised second-reading amendments to eliminate any remaining loopholes in the legislation.

If, as seems certain, the Federal Council (Senate) also backs the law and Putin ratifies it, the ban on promoting “non-traditional sexual relationships or preferences” will extend to all public media, including the Internet and printed publications.

The dissemination of information on “non-traditional lifestyles” and the “rejection of family values” will then be crimes, on the same legal grounds as the production of child pornography, the promotion of violence and the stirring up of racial tensions, ethnic and religious.

The bill generalizes 2013 legislation that makes it a crime to provide information to children about being LGBTIQ, and now includes a provision prohibiting information that could “cause minors to want to change their gender”.

It provides for fines of between 50,000 rubles (A$1,265) and 400,000 rubles (A$10,117) for individuals and five million rubles (A$126,000) for companies. Non-Russians who break the law risk deportation.

The bill passed despite warnings from publishers that many important books, including classics of Russian literature, could be banned for “promoting non-traditional relationships”.

Origins and justifications

The legislation merged two separate initiatives that were before the Duma into a single draft.

A text was supported by the “opposition” parties, the Communist Party of the Russian Federation (KPRF), the just “social-democratic” but socially conservative Russia and the ultra-nationalist Liberal Democratic Party of Russia (LDPR ).

His godmother was Nina Ostanina (KPRF), chairwoman of the Duma Committee on Family, Women and Children. The second project was presented by Deputy UR Alexander Khinshtein, head of the State Duma’s information committee.

According to an October 18 post on the Feminist Anti-War Resistance (FAS) Telegram channel, both drafts affected Russian media and information laws, but it was Khinshtein who proposed extending the law of 2013 from minors to the general population and to pass amendments on “protecting” children from “harmful information” on gender reassignment.

After a cross-party working group did its work, the bill replaced “foreign concepts” like “gender” and “LGBT” with the “clear and familiar concepts” of “sex” and “sodomy” and treated pedophilia and “non-traditional relationships” as if they were the same thing.

FAS commented, “Obviously, the nostalgia for Article 121 of the Soviet Criminal Code (On Sodomy) is more acute than ever.”

With the move, lawmakers continued to reverse minor gains made for LGBTIQ rights in a country where homosexuality, decriminalized after the 1917 revolution, was recriminalized by Stalin in 1933 and remained a crime until 1993 and a “mental illness” until 1999.

It follows the adoption in 2020 of a new constitution which defines marriage only as the union of a man and a woman. When the European Court of Human Rights ordered Russia in 2021 to accept same-sex marriage, he was told to stop meddling in Russian internal affairs.

Defeat Peppa Pig!

Proponents of the law have made no secret of its connection to Russia’s war in Ukraine and its struggle for civilizational values ​​with the “collective West”.

According to UP MP Piotr Tolstoy: “This is a battle we cannot lose, because the future of Russian civilization depends on it.

For the monarchist Konstantin Malofeev, deputy of the UR and owner of the Tsargrad television channel “it is here, in the denial of traditional family values, that the spearhead of this war is to be found”.

Russia’s failures on the Ukrainian front are thus linked to the decline of morality: defeating “sodomy” and the LGBTIQ agents of “the hybrid war of the West” will thus contribute to military victory.

“Communist” Ostanina echoed UP lawmakers: while minors were “protected” from LGBTIQ influence by the 2013 law “the adult population now also needs protection. We need to protect people from this advancing ideological weapon. The war is being waged on all fronts.”

In his Duma speech supporting the bill, Khinshtein said Russian soldiers fighting in Ukraine were there to protect traditional Christian values ​​and that the “special operation” was taking place “not only on the battlefield, but also in people’s minds and souls”.

On this front, the enemies to be chased from the field are caricatures like South Park and Peppa Pig. During his speech in the Duma, Khinshtein screened screenshots of these TV programs, saying they were part of a war “waging against our society”.

The damning proof was the episode of Peppa Pig in which Penny the polar bear appears with two mothers.

Khinshtein’s message echoes that of Putin, under whose rule anti-gay outbursts were a recurring, even pathological feature. For example, in a speech after the Russian Federation annexed four Ukrainian territories, the Russian president mocked “certain genders” and families with “one parent number one and one parent number two.”

The legislation also has the full support of the hierarchy of the Russian Orthodox Church. According to Patriarch Kirill, Russia’s war in Ukraine is a battle between those who support pro-Western gay pride events and those who reject them.

Win against the West?

Khinshtein, however, went to great lengths to clarify that the bill is not intended to ban the LGBTIQ community, but simply to ban the promotion of non-heterosexual behavior.

He told the media: “Our bill is not an act of censorship. We do not ban LGBT as a phenomenon. We’re not forbidding talking about it, we’re just saying that propaganda, that is, positive promotion, praise, that it’s normal and maybe even better than traditional sex, should be prohibited.

Khinshtein is a defensive maneuver aimed at neutralizing sympathy with Russia’s LGBTIQ community, which has grown in strength and organization since homosexuality ceased to be classified as a mental illness.

Natalia Soloviova, spokesperson for the LGBTQ network, said France Media Agency the new law would “create a situation where no one can speak openly or positively about LGBTQ people,” making an increase in hate crimes inevitable.

She added, however, that ordinary Russians do not see the issue of sexual minorities as a priority, especially as daily life has become more difficult due to economic sanctions and international isolation.

On the contrary, the regime abused the rights of sexual minorities to “achieve geopolitical triumphs. The LGBTQ community is seen as a Western thing. So, it’s like a small victory against the West, even if, in reality, it’s not.”

And now?

The Sphere Human Rights Foundation, dedicated to defending the rights of LGTBIQs and already threatened with banning, has launched a “No to State Homophobia” campaign against the bill. She is unlikely to succeed, given that the community seems to have no friends with her in the Russian parliament.

FAS summarizes the situation: “The situation of the queer community will be even more frightening and dark after the passage of the new laws on LGBT propaganda. Not only public activists, but all non-heterosexual and transgender people are at risk of harassment by the authorities for “propaganda”.

Lilya, one of the coordinators of FAS, wrote on October 28 to her non-straight followers: “We are witnessing a new phase of state violence. Authorities are trying to ban any mention of the existence of LGBTQ people. Repression against any minority, against people who think or feel differently, is nothing new. An authoritarian regime needs internal enemies against which to pit society. And now you and I have become such enemies.

“But I want to tell you: whatever happens, whatever cannibalistic laws are passed, whatever they try to convince you that you are not worthy to exist, you are not alone! You are loved, worthy and good enough. You are not a mistake. There is nothing wrong with you.

“I know it may be hard to believe now and it will only get worse in the years to come, but eventually this terrible time will inevitably come to an end.”

[Dick Nichols is Green Left’s European correspondent, based in Barcelona.]

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Legal enough? National removes ad with Katy Perry song | November 3, 2022 https://korsanizle.com/legal-enough-national-removes-ad-with-katy-perry-song-november-3-2022/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 02:27:51 +0000 https://korsanizle.com/legal-enough-national-removes-ad-with-katy-perry-song-november-3-2022/ The government has dipped into its Covid-19 response fund to help boost work on the controversial Three Waters proposal. According to the Herald, around $70 million in pandemic support funds were redirected to three waters in April this year. This is despite a promise from Finance Minister Grant Robertson to only use the fund to […]]]>

The government has dipped into its Covid-19 response fund to help boost work on the controversial Three Waters proposal.

According to the Herald, around $70 million in pandemic support funds were redirected to three waters in April this year. This is despite a promise from Finance Minister Grant Robertson to only use the fund to respond to the pandemic (although this is not the first time it has been used for other costs).

Robertson defended the decision, saying the reallocated money would be spent on a number of areas. This included more than $20 million for policy and communications work, $14.6 million to increase iwi’s understanding of the changes, and nearly $33 million to cover the costs of advice by working with a transition”.

The opposition jumped at the chance to further criticize the government for its wasteful spending. National deputy Nicola Willis told Newstalk ZB that when you hear it comes from the Covid-19 fund, you expect the money to be used to deal with the impact of Covid-19.

“You think nurses, you think hospital – but instead this government has treated the Covid fund as a petty cash account for their sneaky schemes,” she said. “The latter is wasteful and borders on dishonesty.”

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Generational indoctrination: in the roots of the trans movement https://korsanizle.com/generational-indoctrination-in-the-roots-of-the-trans-movement/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 12:33:20 +0000 https://korsanizle.com/generational-indoctrination-in-the-roots-of-the-trans-movement/ Reuters/Tami Chappell As the public becomes more aware of what is happening to children in gender clinics, many are baffled and asking: how did this happen so quickly? While many social changes have occurred rapidly in recent years, given biomedical political and ethical shifts, the philosophical roots of the gender ideology the world is experiencing […]]]>
transgender
Reuters/Tami Chappell

As the public becomes more aware of what is happening to children in gender clinics, many are baffled and asking: how did this happen so quickly?

While many social changes have occurred rapidly in recent years, given biomedical political and ethical shifts, the philosophical roots of the gender ideology the world is experiencing today have a long history that has evolved over time. , according to Dr. Abigail Favale, author of The Genesis of Gender: A Christian Theory professor at the McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame.

In the third installment of The Christian Post’s investigative podcast series “Generation Indoctrination: Inside the Transgender Battle,” Favale explained that much of what is now seen in today’s gender dogma urday dates back to the beginning of the 20th century. Two revolutions, conceptual and contraceptive, have indelibly shaped the way people have thought about what it means to be male and female, especially with the introduction of reproductive technologies such as hormonal birth control.

Regarding the conceptual revolution, Favale argues that the seeds of the gender revolution were sown in part by the French existentialist philosopher Simone de Beauvoir, who wrote The second sex in 1949.

“When she was writing, she didn’t even use the term gender because it was a linguistic term,” Favale told CP.

“But she introduces the idea that the genre would soon be named,” Favale added, noting that this theme emerges most clearly in de Beauvoir’s famous line, “One is not born, but rather becomes a woman,” distinguishing the femininity of femininity.

Radical second-wave feminists — many of whom are among the most vocal opponents of transgender ideology and who often cite de Beauvoir with approval — respond by saying that the feminist writer was about female socialization and cultural and societal expectations. imposed on women as a whole.

Nowhere in her writings did she categorically deny the material reality of biological sex, as trans activists do, feminists argue. In addition to modern gender ideology, these same feminists strongly oppose other scourges that disproportionately harm women, such as pornography, prostitution, and surrogacy, positions that coincide with orthodox Christian ethics. When asked to respond to this claim, Favale concurred but reiterated that these ideas about gender have further evolved from this particular moment in history.

Another major figure who is arguably the godfather of the transgender movement is John Money, a psychologist from New Zealand who was a professor at Johns Hopkins University in Maryland. He made considerable waves in the 1960s with his published articles. Money experimented on human subjects, specifically on Canadian twins Brian and David Reimer.

Speaking about the experiences of the Reimer twins, Carla, a therapist from Loudoun County, Va., whose name has been changed to protect her identity, shared how Money believed babies were born neutral. He was the one who coined the phrase “gender identity” and believed that men could be raised as women, regardless of their biology.

In the case of the Reimer twins, one of the boys, David (who was originally named Bruce), underwent a botched circumcision and was, on Money’s advice, raised as a girl. David Reimer finally learned the truth about what had happened to him, but the mental torment of what he had been through was so overwhelming that he committed suicide in 2004. David’s brother Brian died of a drug overdose.

In Carla’s counseling office, she now sees many young people who are upset about their gender. The change was sudden and she felt unprepared to see the big increase. As she researched the issue further, she discovered a disturbing trend among young people not only were they spending excessive time on their phones and social media, but they had been instilled in the language of mental health disorders and therapy.

“This generation is in a hurry to label and/or diagnose. And we do it to younger and younger children [ages]. More and more, it’s becoming the norm for us to interpret normal feelings and label them as a disease, abnormality or disorder,” Carla said.

“People are calling kids as young as 11 pansexual, bi, or probably gay before the child even knows it,” she added.

Contemporary trans activism rests on a particularly radical notion of individuality, the idea that the self is sovereign, according to Mary Rice Hasson, a lawyer and researcher at the Ethics & Public Policy Center in Washington, D.C. In the United States, a- she said, society came to a critical juncture about seven years ago, when the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage nationwide in Oberfell v. Hodges.

“Once Oberefell fell in 2015, the deal that was reached between transgender groups and activists who were very committed to queer theory was “Okay we got your back, now you got gay marriage, it’s our turn” . The T was added to the LGB because in some ways they were kept secret,” Hasson said.

“And that was one of the complaints of the transgender movement and activists, that they felt like [they were] not embraced by the larger movement. They wanted to be at the forefront and push their agenda forward. It was really a compromise, really an agreement.

So, to many, it seemed like he had gone overnight from fighting against same-sex marriage to promoting trans ideology, but gender identity activists had been preparing long before the historic decision to the High Court. Most alarming for Hasson is how this ideology has seeped into the public school system. Gender dogma is so pervasive and destructive that in 2018 she co-wrote a book with Theresa Farnan urging parents to pull their children out of public schools, Get Out Now: Why You Should Take Your Child Out of Public School Before It’s Too Late.

Doctors Quentin Van Meter and Andre Van Mol, who both appeared on Episode 2 of “Generation Indoctrination” to discuss the emerging medical scandal playing out in transgender clinics and hospitals across the country, also weigh in on the dark story. philosophy of gender ideology.

In episode four, CP will speak with lawmakers and public policy experts on the front lines of these issues, discussing what can be done from a legal perspective.

Send news tips to: brandon.showalter@christianpost.com Listen to Brandon Showalter’s Life in the Kingdom podcast on The Christian Post and the edifi app Follow Brandon Showalter on Facebook: BrandonMarkShowalter Follow on Twitter: @BrandonMShow

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Centenary and still whimsical: Why we’ll never fall in love with movie vampires https://korsanizle.com/centenary-and-still-whimsical-why-well-never-fall-in-love-with-movie-vampires/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 06:00:01 +0000 https://korsanizle.com/centenary-and-still-whimsical-why-well-never-fall-in-love-with-movie-vampires/ On March 4, 1922, a century ago this year, something happened in the Great Marble Hall of Berlin’s famous Zoological Garden that changed film history – the premiere of Nosferatu: Eine Symphonie Des Grauens. Or, in plain language, a public screening of the world’s first vampire film, an adaptation of Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel Dracula […]]]>

On March 4, 1922, a century ago this year, something happened in the Great Marble Hall of Berlin’s famous Zoological Garden that changed film history – the premiere of Nosferatu: Eine Symphonie Des Grauens. Or, in plain language, a public screening of the world’s first vampire film, an adaptation of Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel Dracula by German director FW Murnau. Since then, no literary character has appeared on screen more often.

In truth, Murnau wasn’t even the first movie to feature the Count. Had the 1921 Hungarian film Drakula Halála not been lost, it might claim the vampiric crown of cinema. Nor is Stoker’s novel the first vampire story. The myth itself is ancient and crosses cultures, and John Polidori (in 1819’s The Vampyre) and Sheridan Le Fanu (in 1872’s lesbian chiller Carmilla) beat Stoker in print. But if you want to give vampire cinema a birthplace and origin story, Berlin in 1922 is better than most.

Because it was essentially a bootleg made without permission from Stoker’s estate, the contemporary action of Nosferatu was transposed to Germany in 1838 and all names changed. Count Dracula becomes Count Orlok, Jonathan and Mina Harker become Thomas and Ellen Hutter, and Van Helsing is renamed Professor Bulwer.

Because it was essentially a pirated version and the author’s widow was not stupid, Murnau was prosecuted almost immediately anyway. After a three-year legal battle, all copies of his film were destroyed. But thanks to the sleight of hand (or duplicity, if you will) of the director, the prints continued to appear in London and New York under different titles. A good thing too: posterity has bequeathed to us one of the great achievements of 20th century cinema, a masterpiece of German expressionism and a film tirelessly quoted to the point of having constituted the basic text of practically all vampiric releases. since.

That story, and the stories behind some of the thousands of other films that followed Nosferatu, are the subject of Vampire Cinema: The First One Hundred Years, a timely new book on the genre by cultural critic Christopher Frayling.

As well as browsing the most notable iterations and tracing the popularity of vampire film through various golden ages – in the US, the Bela Lugosi years of the 1930s; in the UK, Hammer’s decade and a half from the late 1950s; on television, from the 1990s – Frayling unveils an appetizing collection of advertising images. These range from posters and illustrations for mainstream productions to seductions for the more sinister end of the spectrum, where the genre collides with blacksploitation films, kung fu films and, inevitably, pornography.

Vampire fans looking for those dubious cinematic pleasures can head to films such as 1972’s Blacula or its 1973 sequel Scream Blacula Scream!). They can unearth the 1974 martial arts-themed film The Legend of the Seven Golden Vampires (“Hammer Horror! Dragon Chills!”). Or they can look for Dracula Sucks, from 1978, which came in soft and hardcore versions. Even Andy Warhol tipped his hat (or more likely his platinum wig) to the vampire movie. Blood For Dracula, also known as Andy Warhol’s Dracula, was released in 1974 and starred German arthouse favorite Udo Kier as the Count alongside Factory superstar Joe Dallesandro, the Little Joe from Walk On The Wild Side.

HeraldScotland:

HeraldScotland:

Frayling’s use of the ordinal number in the title suggests he sees a second century of vampire movies looming. Is our appetite for Dracula really that strong?

“Yes, I think it will last another hundred years and maybe even longer,” he says. “He went through so many incarnations. If you had asked someone in the 18th century about a vampire, they would simply have said that it was a supernatural, rather blasphemous creature that had come back from the dead. So they were seen entirely in Christian terms. If you had asked anyone at the end of the 19th century, they would have said that it was all about psychoanalysis, desire and sex. And since the middle of the 20th century, and especially since the publication of Stephen King’s Salem’s Lot and Anne Rice’s Interview With The Vampire, they have gone from being a kind of soulless creature to a rather soulful creature, with a life interior, and finally a soul mate.

Enter Robert Pattinson as Edward Cullen in Twilight, Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston as cursed vampire lovers in Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alive, and Stephen Moyer as 174-year-old Bill Compton in True Blood, HBO’s award-winning adaptation. from the Southern Vampire Mysteries series by Charlaine Harris. Each of these productions appeared five years apart. Alongside these modern typefaces, there are others. The vampire as a superhero, for example (find it in comic book-style releases such as this year’s Van Helsing, Blade and Morbius), or the vampire as a roommate rather than a soul mate (see What We Do In The Shadows and its spin-off TV sequel).

The clue to why so many readings are possible lies in the flexibility of the vampire mythos. Like all successful viruses, it has the ability to mutate, to adapt, to respond to what Frayling calls “the changing human experience.” And as it adapts, it reshapes itself around both societal and personal fears.

“Horror movies have always had this function of dealing with taboo subjects,” he says. “Desire, lesbianism, incest, drug addiction, etc. You step aside in this world of adult fairy tales and you can tell all kinds of stories that are very difficult to tell otherwise. To this list, add gender, sexual preference, racial stereotypes, and even the ethics of vegetarianism. Dracula, after all, is an apex predator that bites people and then kicks them out. “Identity politics, which is a lot of the way of thinking about both past literature and current culture, fits that myth very well, I think.”

And correcting the blatant sexism of much of the production of the 1960s and 1970s, Frayling sees the recent history of vampire cinema and its literary domains as a dominated distaff.

“Nearly every major literary contribution to vampires over the past 30 years has been written by women,” he says. “I guess post-#MeToo and post-identity politics, there will be a lot of quasi-feminist vampire movies about the fear of predatory men. I think it will go beyond what Hammer did with sexism.

But in addition to changing, there are aspects of the vampire movie that appeal because they continue to resonate for the same reasons they always have. An example, as relevant to Murnau as it is to the 2022 viewer, is the vampire as a carrier of sickness and disease. The German director’s 1838 setting set his story immediately after a notorious plague outbreak in Bremen, but no one watching the film the year it was released would have forgotten the Spanish flu pandemic about a year earlier. After the Covid, it’s the same thing today.

“I just went through another pandemic, I suspect we are [also] about to have a lot more vampire movies that explore the connections between vampirism and the plague,” Frayling says. “This is another example of updating and reconfiguring elements.”

Last month, it was confirmed that Robert Eggers, the director of arthouse horror hits The Witch and The Lighthouse, was planning to write and direct a remake of Nosferatu. If he does, don’t bet against Robert Pattinson donning the fangs again: he appeared in The Lighthouse, and Eggers is a director who likes to cast actors who are familiar to him. So watch this space – at least until the sun goes down and the bats take flight.

“What are the great anxieties? Frayling finally asks. “Think of the ways in which myth can be recast to convey these anxieties, and you see how rich the stitching is.”

Vampire Cinema: The First One Hundred Years by Christopher Frayling is out October 31 (Reel Art Press, £39.95)

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