Feminist Pornography – Korsan Izle http://www.korsanizle.com/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 18:27:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.korsanizle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Feminist Pornography – Korsan Izle http://www.korsanizle.com/ 32 32 11 new non-fiction works to read this season http://www.korsanizle.com/11-new-non-fiction-works-to-read-this-season/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 15:19:10 +0000 http://www.korsanizle.com/11-new-non-fiction-works-to-read-this-season/ In 2018, the Arlee Warriors, a high school boys’ basketball team on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana, were in the midst of a buzzing championship as his town reeled from a cluster of suicides. Streep, who previously featured the team for The New York Times Magazine, takes a look at the lives of the […]]]>

In 2018, the Arlee Warriors, a high school boys’ basketball team on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana, were in the midst of a buzzing championship as his town reeled from a cluster of suicides. Streep, who previously featured the team for The New York Times Magazine, takes a look at the lives of the players, the collective trauma of the city, and the therapeutic power of basketball in Arlee, where the sport “occupies some emotional ground. part between escape and religion ”.

Céladon Books, September 7 | Read our review

In her third book, Prager sets out to tell the stories of the neglected women behind the 1973 Supreme Court ruling. Using unpublished interviews, letters and personal documents, Prager tells Roe’s story through the life of Norma McCorvey, whose unwanted pregnancy gave way to the Supreme Court case, and three other protagonists: Linda Coffee, the lawyer who filed the original lawsuit; Curtis Boyd, a fundamentalist Christian turned abortion provider; and Mildred Jefferson, the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School.

Norton, September 14 | Read our review

In 1659, an Italian court heard a case against caterpillars after locals complained about violating and stealing local gardens. In the years that followed, humans developed innovative ways to combat moose, killer elephants, robber crows, and deadly geriatric trees. After a two-year trip around the world, Roach recounts these methods in his latest book, covering raven blasts in Oklahoma and human-elephant conflict scholars in West Bengal. The result is a rich body of research and reporting revealing the efforts humanity will make to keep the natural world at bay.

Norton, September 14 | Read our review

Srinivasan, an Oxford professor, has developed an enthusiastic following for her astute writing in The London Review of Books, with topics ranging from campus culture wars to octopus intellect. Her 2018 meditation on the politics of sex served as the launching pad for this highly anticipated book, which builds on – and complicates – long-standing feminist theory in six essays on pornography, desire, capitalism and more. Again.

Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Sept. 21


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NXIVM sex sect defendant Allison Mack checks in for three-year stay at Dublin Women’s Correctional Center http://www.korsanizle.com/nxivm-sex-sect-defendant-allison-mack-checks-in-for-three-year-stay-at-dublin-womens-correctional-center/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 21:45:00 +0000 http://www.korsanizle.com/nxivm-sex-sect-defendant-allison-mack-checks-in-for-three-year-stay-at-dublin-womens-correctional-center/ After other famous inmates in recent years, the former Small city Actress Allison Mack will serve her prison sentence in East Bay following her conviction in the chilling sex cult case NXIVM. As viewers of the HBO 2020 documentary series The wish Know that Mack was a defining figure in NXIVM, the sex cult based […]]]>

After other famous inmates in recent years, the former Small city Actress Allison Mack will serve her prison sentence in East Bay following her conviction in the chilling sex cult case NXIVM.

As viewers of the HBO 2020 documentary series The wish Know that Mack was a defining figure in NXIVM, the sex cult based in Albany, New York, posing as a self-improvement organization led by charismatic leader Keith Raniere. Raniere was convicted in 2019 of five counts, including sex trafficking, child sexual exploitation and possession of child pornography, identity theft, forced labor conspiracy and racketeering conspiracy . And Mack was his right-hand man during much of NXIVM’s transformation from an EST-like organization with “executive success workshops” to the recruiting arm of his secret sex cult, called DOS or The Vow.

As TMZ reported, Mack struck a plea deal and was sentenced in June to three years in federal prison. She had faced up to 40 years of age on counts of racketeering and racketeering conspiracy.

Mack may have lived in the Bay Area for the past year, as the Bay Area News Group reports, and was at least taking virtual classes at UC Berkeley last summer and fall. VICE spoke about several undergraduates at Berkeley who were upset to learn Mack’s story after The wish created, after realizing that they had shared classes with her in which they disclosed personal trauma and stories about themselves. Mack, ironically, was reportedly enrolled in courses titled “The History and Practice of Human Rights” and “The Black Feminist Healing Arts.”

Mack went to the Federal Corrections Institute in Dublin on Monday – the same prison that housed college admissions scandal celebrities Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman. Loughlin spent two months at the facility last year, starting in November, and Huffman served just 10 days of a 14-day sentence in October 2019.

As TMZ notes, Mack showed up to serve her sentence two weeks earlier than she was due to start on September 29.

A judge discovered that Mack was an accomplice in Raniere’s scheme to recruit and enslave young women, convincing them that by committing to have sex with Raniere – and being branded with his and Mack’s initials – they could “repair” or improve. The secret group, which was unknown to many members of the larger NXIVM organization, became like a pyramid scheme in which female slaves themselves would become masters, and recruit and enslave others.

Mack was on the run with Raniere and in hiding in Puerto Vallarta when Raniere was arrested in March 2018. She was later extradited herself.

When she pleaded guilty in 2019, Mack reportedly sobbed and said, “I have to take full responsibility for my conduct. I am so sorry for my role in this matter. I am so sorry for my family and the good people. that I have hurt by my mistaken adherence to Keith Raniere’s teachings. ”

Upon her sentencing, she said: “I made choices that I will regret forever.” And to Raniere’s victims, she said, “From the bottom of my heart and soul, I’m sorry.”

Previously, Seagram’s heiress Clare Bronfman was also convicted in connection with NXIVM and sentenced to 81 months in prison. Nancy Salzman, who co-founded the NXIVM organization with Raniere in 1998 and was widely viewed by group members as Raniere’s “facilitator”, has pleaded guilty to one count of racketeering conspiracy and is still awaiting conviction. .

If you’re curious, The New York Times has a timeline of events in the NXIVM case.

Top Image: Actress Allison Mack leaves the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York City following a status conference on June 12, 2018 in the Brooklyn neighborhood of New York City. (Photo by Drew Angerer / Getty Images)


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A teacher in Exeter has been punished for sexual misconduct. The student says that never happened. http://www.korsanizle.com/a-teacher-in-exeter-has-been-punished-for-sexual-misconduct-the-student-says-that-never-happened/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 11:03:45 +0000 http://www.korsanizle.com/a-teacher-in-exeter-has-been-punished-for-sexual-misconduct-the-student-says-that-never-happened/ In its report, Holland & Knight raised a “systemic concern” with a “lack of an established and clear protocol for students, faculty and staff to formulate complaints and training for AEP administrators on how to address concerns about misconduct by teachers or staff impacting students. Over the past five years, Exeter has stated on its […]]]>

In its report, Holland & Knight raised a “systemic concern” with a “lack of an established and clear protocol for students, faculty and staff to formulate complaints and training for AEP administrators on how to address concerns about misconduct by teachers or staff impacting students. Over the past five years, Exeter has stated on its website: preventing sexual misconduct and clear policies and procedures for responding to reports of misconduct when they occur.

“There is no higher priority for the Academy than providing a safe and inclusive environment for all of our students, an environment free from sexual abuse and harassment in all its forms,” the school said.

When i called Principal Rawson a few days after speaking with Christina Palmer, I imagined that given the recent problems in Exeter, he would be relieved to learn that there was nothing in this anonymous allegation about David Weber and me. I wanted Rawson to hear it firsthand, so that there was no confusion on this point: that there was no reason to go ahead with an investigation of Weber, at least not. regarding this false allegation.

I was still very upset about my call with Palmer when I called Rawson; in fact, several times when I spoke with him, I was so suffocated that I was unable to speak; I started to cry as I explained that my level of emotion was due to the fact that Palmer’s interrogation had elicited feelings around my past experience of sexual assault that had nothing to do with Exeter or Weber.

Rawson listened patiently, allowing me to complain about Palmer’s manner on his call, for which he apologized for any “damage” he may have caused (prejudice was a word he used a lot). I asked him who made this allegation about Weber and me. Rawson said he couldn’t say because those allegations had to be kept anonymous in order to protect the identity of the accusers so that they felt “safe” to come forward.

I asked if maybe the allegation was an old one that the academy was grappling with now? Because in 2016 I explained that amid all the media attention around Exeter that year, a classmate emailed me information on how to report sexual misconduct. from teachers. It was the first time I learned that apparently there had been rumors about Weber and me among some of my peers. Maybe it was because Weber and I had been so close? I asked myself. Or maybe it was because at the time other children were known to be involved with teachers? I told Rawson that there was no basis for these rumors, however, that I had also let my classmate know at the time.

Rawson said no, the accuser was not the person whose name I shared. Then I didn’t know who it could be, I said, saying that it all upset me because Weber had been a great teacher and my friend. Rawson just listened and whispered in his sympathetic way.

Then he said he was sorry to have to inform me, but I was going to hear from the Exeter Police, to whom the academy is obligated to report any allegations of sexual misconduct. I later learned this was due to the ‘memorandum of understanding’ between the school and the Exeter Police Department that the academy revised in 2017 following revelations about its past failure to report crimes. on campus to local authorities and to the New Division of Hampshire for children, youth and families. “The MOU describes the duty of all adults,” the 2017 document reads, “and underscores the PEA’s commitment to immediately report any act of sexual assault, regardless of the possible legal qualification of it. act or the time at which the act was committed.

I told Rawson that in fact I had been contacted by an Exeter Police Detective, who emailed me the same day. Rawson again apologized for the inconvenience and “harm” that might be inflicted on me through this experience, and said he would forward my complaints to Palmer, who had previously emailed me for s. ‘apologize for our conversation. “I am deeply sorry for the harm I have caused,” she wrote, “and I hope you were able to find comfort from someone… We appreciate how much hearing from an allegation can be shocking, ”she added.

When I called the detective back I left him a voicemail saying that if it was an allegation about me and a teacher in Exeter such an allegation was false and I had nothing to report. I haven’t heard from her anymore. I thought the case was closed.

Later in the Fall 2020, I remember reading in the news that a former math teacher from Exeter, Szczesny Jerzy Kaminski, 60, was accused of sexually assaulting a student between 2013 and 2015. The alumni Facebook page ‘Exeter “Exonians” has flared up again with people expressing concern. “The broader context of this case,” commented Cynthia Fuguet Mare, promotion of 83, is “how the Academy, after having been confronted in recent years with evidence of sexual abuse of minors in its care … how , through police investigations and arrests, legal proceedings, studies, committees, policies and training, mea culpas to the entire PEA community… can ALWAYS fail to protect students.

At the end of October 2020, I had another call with Rawson. Something had been pestering me – I didn’t know why, but I felt like this thing with Weber and Exeter wasn’t over, and I wanted to make sure it really was. But during our conversation, Rawson gave me no indication that the Weber investigation had continued. We chatted, talked about how things were at school. He said maybe in the spring, if the pandemic allows, I should come and talk to the kids about social media.

I didn’t hear from Rawson until almost four months later, on February 13, 2021. He asked to speak this weekend: “I have to update you on developments regarding a faculty member here who we have. already discussed.

I said I was available. “I hope all is well,” I wrote.

Rawson replied, “We have a confession that compels us to take action against him. I need to explain. I’m so sorry to have to bring this to your attention, in addition to the miscommunication previously.

” A confession ? ” I answered. “Something about me ??? Now I am very curious. Can you call me now? “

“Yes,” Rawson wrote. “I’ll call in a few minutes. “

While waiting for the phone to ring, I thought I was going to throw up. I started to feel dizzy, like I was going to fall, so I sat on the sofa. I now remembered how, after being raped at the University of Miami, I came home and lay on the bathroom floor for a long time; I remembered how soothing the cold tiles on the floor were and tried to focus on just that. One of the elements of the trauma that I had buried for so long was my feeling that I had been deprived of my consent. I didn’t want what the boy had done to happen to me, but it had happened despite my refusal, and the shock and rage I felt was more than I could take for many years.


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Is Noah Berlatsky canceled? http://www.korsanizle.com/is-noah-berlatsky-canceled/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 09:57:48 +0000 http://www.korsanizle.com/is-noah-berlatsky-canceled/ Twitter far-left warrior Noah Berlatsky has gained notoriety online for such blunt observations as “Why Ant-Man Should Be Black,” an article that Vice, to his embarrassment, published. This forced clickbait – in other words, Berlatsky’s usual tariff – in which the writer postulates that “the central power of the hero [is] whiteness ”, has earned […]]]>

Twitter far-left warrior Noah Berlatsky has gained notoriety online for such blunt observations as “Why Ant-Man Should Be Black,” an article that Vice, to his embarrassment, published. This forced clickbait – in other words, Berlatsky’s usual tariff – in which the writer postulates that “the central power of the hero [is] whiteness ”, has earned the author many well-deserved derision, but the latest controversy in which he is embroiled goes far beyond mere embarrassment. In fact, she has the makings of an annulment because it has to do with her perceived defense of pedophiles.

Berlatsky is the communications director of an organization known as the Prostasia Foundation, which says its mission is to “prevent child sexual abuse before it happens, rather than simply hunting down and punishing those who have. already offended “. It sounds reasonable, so why are so many people convinced that Prostasia is a pro-pedophile group disguised as a children’s rights organization?

Let’s start with the fact that the organization does not use the word “pedophile”, preferring instead to use “minor attracted person” – MAP – a more neutral designation that has enraged many and appears to have little to do with the protection of children. It’s no surprise that the neologism was seen as a rebranding effort for pedophilia, given the pejorative impact of the word “pedophile,” which is defined as “a person sexually attracted to children.” Whenever a fledgling political movement is underway, the top of the to-do list is manipulating language. With the “awakened” movement, for example, the definition of “white supremacist” was broadened beyond its original meaning, and coined words like “whiteness” and “white fragility” appeared.

Prostasia has drawn criticism for promoting the MAP Support Club, which it calls “a safe, chat-based peer support network for minors attracted to those aged 13 and over.” Prostasia thinks it’s a good idea to support a place where younger teens can socialize with adult adults who are drawn to them, but I’m not convinced. The MAP Support Club promotes itself as a “support chat for people attracted to minors who are fundamentally against child sexual abuse,” but pedophiles’ eyes should light up when they hear about a place they are. can chat with 13-year-olds and then maybe find a way to make the chat private after spending enough time preparing them. Prostasia must have known that the approval of this meeting place was going to provoke outrage, but she did it anyway, in the name of “stopping child abuse”.

Prostasia has aligned himself with some advocating questionable agendas, including having clinical psychologist James Cantor on his team, who advocates for the inclusion of pedophiles in the LGBT coalition. In a 2019 interview for 60 Minutes Australia, Cantor referred to “righteous pedophiles”, referring to those who claim, without verification, not to act on their impulses.

For Prostasia, Berlatsky conducted a friendly interview with Mireille Miller-Young, professor of feminist studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who told him that for children being exposed to pornography can be joyful and fun. The interviewer offered no hindsight.

On the other hand, Berlatsky took a lot of abuse for his item in Atlantic which referred to “child sex workers”. The objection was based on the assumption that minors selling on the streets are trafficked, rather than sex workers. But they are not all victims of trafficking; some do it out of necessity, and Berlatsky has rightly pointed out that they shouldn’t be arrested and then have to face a criminal record at such a young age. In this case, Berlatsky’s criticisms were unwarranted.

Berlatsky’s employer Prostasia is campaigning for the legalization of sex dolls, claiming they can take the place of a child in the erotic imagination of a pedophile. If so, no matter how disgusting this product is on the surface, it could still come in handy. But there is no definitive research indicating that the “surrogate” theory is true. Critics say such dolls normalize sexual assault on children and undermine the societal barriers that deter them.

Berlatsky is the type to smear people with attacks he would be afraid to face. Full Disclosure: I’ve had a controversial online relationship with Berlatsky for years, both on Twitter and in the comments section of Splice Today, to which he regularly contributes. In short, we can’t stand each other. But being widely vilified seems to be something Berlatsky thrives on. And now he finds himself in a situation where this strange addiction will be put to the test.

People are now running away from Berlatsky. Even Arthur Chu, another Twitter “blue check” – and an equally nasty person – ditched him on Twitter, claiming he would never work with Berlatsky again. When you are a progressive and you have lost Arthur Chu, you are radioactive.

But despite my intense dislike of Berlatsky, I don’t go with the crowd on Twitter that suggests, because of his work for Prostasia, that he is a pedophile. But Liz Breunig, a former New York Times writer who now writes for Atlantic, is less circumspect. “Don’t let me see you within 500 feet of an elementary school,” she said tweeted, referring to his nemesis.

But I could understand why people wouldn’t want to have their young children around someone who chose to promote the agenda of a group that claims its mission to be the prevention of child abuse, but often seems over. interested in covering pedophiles. Parents cannot take any chances if there is a red flag. In addition, I do not want pedophiles to be welcomed into the Rainbow Coalition and thus receive the protections that this implies. Prostasia seems to believe the opposite.

Do I want to see Berlatsky, one of the smartest creations on social media, canceled? Not at this point, but I can’t help but reflect on how much of Twitter’s darker elements have been the product of people who share its reckless and vindictive temper. There’s nothing Berlatsky loves more than calling someone he doesn’t agree with a fascist, fanatic or racist, but now he’s accused of being something even worse : a pedophile. Once you are tainted with this word, it is difficult to get rid of it.

Although Berlatsky’s biography on LinkedIn indicates that he is a “quick learner,” as you see on the resumes of senior citizens due to their lack of professional experience, he does not appear to have learned any crucial life lessons. . One of them is that after devoting himself to undermining the reputations of many people who did not deserve his abuse, things might not turn out so well when he decides to work with a pedophile friendly group. Berlatsky is a schadenfreude magnet at this point.

Poetic justice can be harsh. Today, Berlatsky has the chance to experience what he has made others feel. I have no sympathy for him. Anyone who chooses to become a swamp creature takes the risk of being engulfed by the swamp if they walk through the wrong mud hole.



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It’s time to respect romance novels as a genre http://www.korsanizle.com/its-time-to-respect-romance-novels-as-a-genre/ Wed, 01 Sep 2021 21:25:54 +0000 http://www.korsanizle.com/its-time-to-respect-romance-novels-as-a-genre/ By Atiritka Kumar September 1, 2021 Juana Garcia / The Cougar As the world slowly moves towards a more inclusive society, it’s time for romance novels to be seen as a worthy genre and given the respect and recognition they deserve. Romance novels are a genre where the emphasis is on the relationship and love […]]]>


Juana Garcia / The Cougar

As the world slowly moves towards a more inclusive society, it’s time for romance novels to be seen as a worthy genre and given the respect and recognition they deserve.

Romance novels are a genre where the emphasis is on the relationship and love between two people. Novels generally have a satisfying end to the readers, a happy one forever.

Although romance novels are a thriving billion dollar industry, the genre is stereotype also soft or easy to read. Many are put off as guilty pleasures or light reading. The respect given to someone who reads a classic or science fiction is not given to a reader of romance.

In his research thesis The romantic publishing industry and its reputation Laurence Cameron notes how misogyny and patriarchal society play a major role in how people perceive the romance genre. The ridiculous thing about the genre is that it’s written by women for women.

Romance has a lot of different subgenres, such as historical romances, young adults, paranormal and eroticism. These novels explore many themes like self-discovery, self-love, healing and the pursuit of happiness.

While some novels contain explicit scenes, many do not. Reducing a romance novel to pornography or fluff not only insults the author and readers, but also ignores the wide variety of interesting stories produced in the genre.

Romance also provides a safe space for teens to explore their sexuality and interests. Cameron complaints people don’t like romance because it allows women to explore and control their sexuality.

It is true that society does not like women to appropriate their bodies as shown laws be adopted to govern women’s reproductive rights. Fwith fictitious and real women being able to take control of their own bodies and sexuality, it is empowerment.

Another criticism is that romance novels can contain non-feminist ideas like being a damsel in distress. While this may be true for some novels, love and romance doesn’t automatically make a woman weak. Additionally, many new romance novels have more progressive storylines.

Romance novels are ridiculed for being exactly what they are: emotionally rewarding stories that give women a satisfying ending. But it shouldn’t be. Women shouldn’t feel ashamed or guilty when reading a romance.

It’s time for women to be accepted to embrace their hobbies and interests. Romance is a valid genre and the only reason it isn’t seen as such is because of misogyny. It’s time to change that perception and respect the romantic genre.

Atiritka Kumar is a first year journalism student who can be contacted at [email protected]

Key words: books, feminism, romance



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Amia Srinivasan’s new book unboxes sex, politics and discomfort http://www.korsanizle.com/amia-srinivasans-new-book-unboxes-sex-politics-and-discomfort/ Fri, 27 Aug 2021 16:51:15 +0000 http://www.korsanizle.com/amia-srinivasans-new-book-unboxes-sex-politics-and-discomfort/ Oxford philosopher Amia Srinivasan has published one of the most controversial books of the year and could change our view of feminism It’s the start of the day in Oxford. Amia Srinivasan probably woke up early enough for our morning Zoom call, but she didn’t let it be heard. Her long loose hair and glowing […]]]>

Oxford philosopher Amia Srinivasan has published one of the most controversial books of the year and could change our view of feminism

It’s the start of the day in Oxford. Amia Srinivasan probably woke up early enough for our morning Zoom call, but she didn’t let it be heard. Her long loose hair and glowing skin, the Indo-American speaks with a cut accent, pausing between questions as she frames her answers. It’s easy to imagine the 36-year-old in the classroom at All Souls College, Oxford, where she teaches philosophy and holds the prestigious Chichele Chair in Social and Political Theory (a statutory chair) since January 2020. Much has been written about her being the first woman, the first person of color and the youngest to hold this position, but it is evident that Srinivasan ignores these labels.

Now, with the launch of his first non-fiction book, The right to sex, we still write a lot about it. The Dividing Work – a six-essay collection that attempts to break the politics of desire, discusses the pitfalls of pornography, and asks questions about the right to sex in a world where the personal is political – has had wheelchair philosophers , feminists, LGBTQI + and even her peers criticize her for her cheeky approach to sex. But she is open to everything. “I like criticism; I think it’s an important part of the feminist tradition, ”she told me with a smile.

The book was born from an essay, Does anyone have the right to have sex? (published in the London book review in 2018), and was written over two summers in California, where as she put it The Guardian, she “got up at 6 am to surf before going to work”. It delves into uncomfortable questions: what makes one person eminently more desirable than another, who decides it, what is the relationship between feminism and state power, how consent works in this era. #MeToo. It’s also a heavily loaded weapon that challenges what many feminists and philosophers have said so far. Srinivasan addresses some of them in his conversation with The Hindu weekend.

Amia Srinivasan: Sex, Politics, and Discomfort

what The right to sex does mean to you?

The notion that interests me is this idea rooted in male sexual law – that men have a right to have a certain amount of sex, whether women want it or not. You see this explicitly at play in the so-called incel subculture [involuntary celibates, who claim they are unable to get a romantic or sexual partner despite desiring one]. These young men talk about themselves as if they are alone and sexually marginalized, but what really upsets them is that they don’t get their due, sexually speaking. [As Srinivasan explained in an earlier interview, they aren’t able to attract the sort of women that could confer a high sexual status on them.] It comes from an ideology of male sexual rights.

Feminism has been reused today to adapt to the world we live in.

I think the resurgence of feminism is a good thing, but I’m worried about some of the forms it can take. Globally, there is a certain type of dominant feminism that is fundamentally interested not in the critique of structures, but in the insertion of women into pre-existing structures of inequality. So while the question of how many women are on your board or how many women are in political leadership positions is important, it prevents us from considering whether the board is a good democratic structure to begin with. Should we have companies wielding so much influence in society? Does party politics, as it exists now, really liberate people, especially women? I think there may be a tendency to focus on middle class and wealthy women and not pay enough attention to the most vulnerable.

How does the politics of desire play out in deeply patriarchal countries?

There is a deep asymmetry in most societies. On the one hand, there is an implicit understanding, even though people objectively deny it as they do in the UK, that men, in a certain sense, have a right to have sex. For example, almost everywhere marital rape goes unrecognized, or was only recognized very recently. The whole point of the marriage contract is that men get their right to as much sex as they want. The flip side is that women are not allowed to have sex on their terms. They play out differently in different cultures, but I think it’s no coincidence that assertion of male sexual rights goes hand in hand with denial of female sexual agency, desire, and pleasure.

Amia Srinivasan

Why is open access to pornography problematic?

I wasn’t really concerned with pornography until I started teaching the debates feminists had in the US and UK, especially in the ’70s and’ 80s. And I found out that my students reacted very strongly, often siding with those who were very critical of pornography. I think the reason for this is that they belong to a generation that has come of age when online pornography is rampant. This mainstream porn doesn’t help set expectations, tell them the truth about sex, offer alternative perspectives. This is porn [that is limiting] which trains people to experience pleasure as acts of male domination and female subordination.

Many of the concepts you refer to are quite western. Who is the audience you wrote for?

I am a member of the Indian diaspora [born to Indian parents in Bahrain]. I grew up in the US and UK and therefore most of my focus points come from a feminist tradition in a sort of English-speaking tradition. I think some of these notions, like male sexual law and rape culture, travel quite well, but there are also important cultural and historical specifics that shape sexual rights regimes in particular countries. I don’t expect the book to have automatic meaning, and I don’t aspire to some sort of completeness or global reach. But hopefully this will contribute to a conversation.

Posted by Bloomsbury, The right to sex is ₹ 699 (delivered hardback), at bloomsbury.com.


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The right to sex – a woman’s power to choose http://www.korsanizle.com/the-right-to-sex-a-womans-power-to-choose/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 14:30:24 +0000 http://www.korsanizle.com/the-right-to-sex-a-womans-power-to-choose/ Non-fiction updates Sign up for myFT Daily Digest to be the first to know about Non-Fiction news. “The whole new way of thinking is about loss / In this it looks like all the old thinking. I remembered these lines from the American poet Robert Hass, reading Amia Srinivasan’s collection of essays, The right to […]]]>

Non-fiction updates

“The whole new way of thinking is about loss / In this it looks like all the old thinking. I remembered these lines from the American poet Robert Hass, reading Amia Srinivasan’s collection of essays, The right to sexexcept in this case, the new thought, like the old one, is about power.

Srinivasan is a feminist professor of social and political theory at Oxford, whose essay “Does Anyone Have the Right to Have Sex?” first appeared in the London Review of Books in 2018. The article is inspired by the 2014 University of California Santa Barbara murders by a self-proclaimed “incel” (unintentional bachelor) Elliot Rodger.

Rodger’s murderous madness was a violent expression of male sexual rights (he hated women, and feminists in particular, because they didn’t give him the sex he wanted). But Srinivasan argued that there was a perverse logic in his rage against sexual hierarchy and marginalization.

No one has the right to have sex, or to be sexually desired, but there is a proto-feminist core in the idea that sex is an effect of unequal access to power and authority. . Indeed, this idea was at the heart of the women’s liberation movement of the 1960s and 1970s.

Politics shapes sexual desire and “what is ugliest about our social realities” (Srinivasan cites racism and ableism as examples) shapes the hierarchy of who is and who is not “fuckable”. Srinivasan’s ambition in this book is, she tells us, to rethink sex as a political phenomenon and thus make feminism fit for the 21st century.

Like the second wave feminists of the 1970s and 1980s (she quotes among others Catherine MacKinnon, Andrea Dworkin and Adrienne Rich), she insists on the link between the “public dimensions of their oppression” and the private experience of sex and relationships. But if the shorthand of the 1970s was “the personal is political,” Srinivasan’s argument might be condensed to the slogan “beyond the right to choose.” If choice (whether or not to have sex) is the marker of emancipation, what happens to all those for whom no choice is offered?

Here she takes the shibboleth of “consent” as a measure of good sex. The idea that the dividing line between good and bad sex is whether it is wanted or not – a central idea of ​​the #MeToo movement – ignores the ways in which desire is already constrained by social and economic inequalities.

Srinivasan’s argument reaches its climax for current feminist orthodoxies when she questions the “believe in women” injunction that accuses men of sexual assault. False rape charges are rare, but in a society that jails disproportionate numbers of black men for sex crimes, feminists should be careful not to side with the prison state: “Who do we believe, woman?” white woman who claims to have been raped or the black or brunette woman who insists that her son is being tricked?

Srinivasan believes that our desires have already been imprisoned. In one of the more interesting essays, she describes teaching her students anti-pornography feminism of the 1970s. She expects the youth in her seminary to have little time for the 1980s slogan ” porn is theory, rape is practice, “which explicitly linked the degradation of women in porn to misogynistic violence. Yet she finds them receptive to anti-porn feminists.

They have come of age in the age of online pornography and feel disconnected from their own desires, which have been supplanted by the sex they see portrayed on screen. “The psyches of my students are the product of pornography. The warnings of anti-porn feminists seem to have been realized late: sex for my students is what porn says.

Srinivasan likes the distinction between radical (good) and liberal (bad). But radical politics demand a program. How to liberate sex from the distortions of oppression? If you truly believe that the psyche is a product of political power and can be made to conform to the dominant forces of social life, then real change is only possible through revolution.

Instead, Srinivasan alludes to the power of the imagination to redeem sex, suggesting that young people can create new sexual desires, “more joyous, more equal, more free.” Perhaps this performative gesture towards possibility is necessary to save us all from stifling pessimism, but the idea that the imagination can choose to make sex good again strikes me as decidedly liberal.

Or rather, it’s utopian. The Srinivasan case for the abolition of prisons and “a restructuring of economic relations such as crimes of survival – theft of food, crossing borders, homelessness – [are] useless ”, is part of a long and respectable tradition of utopian socialist feminism. As a teacher, Srinivasan needs to believe that arguments have real effects. But I still wanted to know why the radical feminists of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s did not win. Perhaps it was the lack of new and better forms of education that would free the imagination to restructure economic and sexual relationships. Or maybe those same arguments will be repeated in 50 years.

The right to sex by Amia Srinivasan Bloomsbury £ 20 / Farrar, Straus and Giroux $ 28, 304 pages

Clair Wills is King Edward VII Professor of English Literature at the University of Cambridge

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An invigorating controversy over the oppression of women: Vicky Allan returns to Something Out of Place by Eimear McBride http://www.korsanizle.com/an-invigorating-controversy-over-the-oppression-of-women-vicky-allan-returns-to-something-out-of-place-by-eimear-mcbride/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 14:00:07 +0000 http://www.korsanizle.com/an-invigorating-controversy-over-the-oppression-of-women-vicky-allan-returns-to-something-out-of-place-by-eimear-mcbride/ Welcome Collection, £ 9.99 Review by Vicky Allan Novelist Eimear McBride, whose fictional tale of Irish youth, A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing, won the Woman’s Prize, made her first foray into non-fiction, writing a short controversy that addresses the questions of objectification and oppression of women, mainly through the prism of disgust. Its final […]]]>

Welcome Collection, £ 9.99

Review by Vicky Allan

Novelist Eimear McBride, whose fictional tale of Irish youth, A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing, won the Woman’s Prize, made her first foray into non-fiction, writing a short controversy that addresses the questions of objectification and oppression of women, mainly through the prism of disgust.

Its final pages are a postscript written following the murder of Sarah Everard. We might not immediately think of the word “loathing” when we think of this recent horror, or the reaction to it, but McBride makes the connection – she has already done over 160 pages – between the violence to which women are subjected, the fear in which they live and a particular understanding of disgust.

She observes: “Misogyny has always been the most socially acceptable hatred … The men who murder it are not seen as representatives of a deep-rooted institutional blindness to essential humanity, rights and good. -being women. They are excused and explained as oddities and anomalies. Their hatred of women, their desire to harm their bodies, either physically or sexually, is not taken seriously. It is not even considered hate, and more often than not it is considered to have been provoked in the first place.

The disgust his book focuses on is more than the mere terror we might feel at the consumption of pathogens. It is a “consciousness of being defiled”. Why have we seen this loathing so heavily applied to women and their bodies?

To figure this out, McBride looks at something we commonly look at with disgust: dirt. She quotes British anthropologist Mary Douglas, who in her book Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concepts of Pollution and Taboo, wrote: the question is out of place.

Just as dirt is “misplaced matter”, so too are women who express themselves or do not conform to stereotypes imposed on them.

It often feels like McBride’s big thoughts and slender phrases need more room to breathe. She goes through several current feminist issues from #MeToo to porn, but where she’s at her best is talking about that visceral aspect.

I was drawn to Something Out Of Place because I think you have to resist the disgust of almost any guy. Before reading it, I might have said that I didn’t have a strong sense of disgust to resist.

But McBride’s controversy reminded me of how much absorbed disgust directed at women still resides in me. As McBride writes: “The loathing I wrote about, which has been so successfully deployed in the war on women, creating and naming our own places in the world, has surrounded us and has even succeeded. to slip inside us.

I wish McBride had gone deeper and deeper into this visceral subject, digging deeper into this dirt, because it is this aspect that sets her book apart as a feminist polemic.

I would also have liked her to examine what this “something irrelevant” might add to our understanding of the toxic debate around trans rights, since cis women and trans people of all gender identities can be considered. like plus or minus degrees “irrelevant”.

But, those questions aside, this is an invigorating call to reject the disgust directed at women at every turn. It’s also a reminder that it’s not about you, it’s the system, an aspect of patriarchy and a whole way of thinking that treats us women like this irrelevant matter – and that can only to arm and strengthen us all.

Eimear McBride will speak about his new book at the Edinburgh International Book Festival on Thursday August 26 https://www.edbookfest.co.uk/the-festival/whats-on/eimear-mcbride-disgust


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OnlyFans Pivot Leaves Fewer Options For Adult Content Creators – The Hollywood Reporter http://www.korsanizle.com/onlyfans-pivot-leaves-fewer-options-for-adult-content-creators-the-hollywood-reporter/ Fri, 20 Aug 2021 22:29:12 +0000 http://www.korsanizle.com/onlyfans-pivot-leaves-fewer-options-for-adult-content-creators-the-hollywood-reporter/ Siri Dahl was on a hair-raising date on August 19 when she heard the news: OnlyFans, the platform she relies on 90% of her income on, is reportedly banning sexually explicit photos and videos from October. But Dahl, a creator and adult movie star, hasn’t learned anything from OnlyFans. Instead, she received a text from […]]]>

Siri Dahl was on a hair-raising date on August 19 when she heard the news: OnlyFans, the platform she relies on 90% of her income on, is reportedly banning sexually explicit photos and videos from October.

But Dahl, a creator and adult movie star, hasn’t learned anything from OnlyFans. Instead, she received a text from another reporter whom she had not spoken to for several months, asking her: Did you hear?

“Without even having any context, I immediately knew absolutely,” says Dahl. “OnlyFans had made an announcement. I just knew it.

She quickly took to Twitter, refreshing her feed to find articles and more information on what OnlyFans was up to. She also received a screenshot of the email ad OnlyFans sent to the media, which stated that “sexually explicit conduct” would be banned on the platform, but nudity – as long as it complied with OnlyFans’ acceptable use policy – would be allowed.

Siri dahl
Inamorata Photo / inamorataphoto.com

“It doesn’t surprise me that they just prefer to blind us all simultaneously,” Dahl says. “It has the effect of making us frozen and unable to really make decisions about anything because of the vagueness they are approaching it. [with]. “

On August 20, OnlyFans updated its acceptable use policy to clarify “sexually explicit conduct” as actual or simulated sex, including “genital-genital, oral-genital, anal-genital or oral-anal , between people of any sex ”; masturbation, “material representing bodily fluids commonly secreted during sexual conduct” and “any exposure of the anus or genitals of any person that is extreme or offensive”. Content that falls within OnlyFans’ definition of sexually explicit conduct must be removed by December 1 “or such other date” communicated to users by the company, according to the policy.

But regardless of how OnlyFans decides to enforce these new rules, the sex workers who spoke with Hollywood journalist say it’s a cycle they’re all too familiar with: one platform becomes popular and makes money off the backs of sex workers, only to seemingly ditch those creators later when they’re too closely associated or are under pressure from external trading partners.

It’s a similar situation to when Tumblr banned pornography, and crowdfunding site Patreon began suspending the pages of adult content creators in 2018, citing pressure from payment processors. MasterCard, Visa and PayPal have also cut ties with PornHub, forcing artists to find other payment options for their work.

When OnlyFans arrived on the scene in 2016, the platform was praised for being a haven for adult content creators – especially those from under-represented backgrounds who may have struggled to find work. in the traditional adult film industry – to monetize their work, even if they had to give up a 20 percent cut to the platform.

But with Thursday’s announcement, OnlyFans indicated that demands from banking partners and payment providers were the reason for upcoming rule changes regarding sexually explicit content. The company is struggling to find outside investors at a $ 1 billion valuation because Axes reported, and upcoming changes from MasterCard, which has said it will implement stricter rules around pornography and require artists to verify their identities, among other changes, have only added to additional complications to OnlyFans’ ability to seek investors.

“Banks and other financial partners are introducing more controls. We want to ensure the sustainability of our business and the decision we make makes us more acceptable to these people, ”said Guy Stokely, Chief Financial Officer of OnlyFans. Financial Time.

In a press release sent to THR, a spokesperson for MasterCard said the company was only made aware of OnlyFans’ decision through news reports on Thursday. “It is a decision that they have come to themselves,” said the spokesperson.

But in responding to requests from funding partners, sex workers who spoke with THR say OnlyFans is putting many sex workers back into a financially precarious situation they had previously gotten out of because of the platform.

“There is a power dynamic that we don’t often talk about. It’s almost like OnlyFans has created some amazing things and we are partners and we make them great. But the reality is, we can’t create the same structure when they pull the rug out from under us, ”Jet Setting Jasmine, psychotherapist, sex worker, and content creator who runs a production company with her partner. Black King, said. “We cannot approach a bank as a sex worker and create this structure for ourselves. “

Creators and political experts say evangelical groups and lobbyists have long pressured banking institutions to penalize the creators of adult entertainment, even though the work they do is legal, under the banner of trying. to put an end to the trafficking in human beings or the exploitation of children.

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Sinnamon Love
Courtesy of the subject

“Pornography has been declared separate from prostitution since People against Freeman in 1988, ” Sinnamon Love, a veteran sex worker, black feminist pornographer and founder of the BIPOC Adult Industry Collective, says. “It’s a legal industry. The way these anti-porn lobbyists try to equate pornography with prostitution and pornography with exploitation is really trying to roll back a federal government [ruling]. “

Mike Stabile, spokesperson for the Free Speech Coalition, says banks and credit card companies are “uniquely placed to be vulnerable” to the influence of anti-porn lobbyists and evangelical groups because they are conservative and “risk averse” institutions.

“It’s already a sector of the economy that is very reluctant to be associated with sex work, and so if these groups can come in and add language about trafficking, if they can add language about illegal content, that it doesn’t take much to move that needle, ”says Stabile.

On the contrary, having fewer options for earning money can push sex workers into riskier situations, according to the Adult Industry Laborers & Artists Association.

“Those who earn an income safely online through OnlyFans can now be coerced into riskier street sex work or even pushed into sex trafficking because of MasterCard’s anti-sex work policies,” said Mary Moody, co-chair of AILAA. in an email.

Some sex workers have turned to cryptocurrency because they find themselves shunned by traditional banking institutions. But without traditional payment options to help prove their income, sex workers find themselves at a disadvantage when they seek government assistance or housing.

“Even if you only earn $ 140 a month on OnlyFans, being able to prove that it gives you access to other resources that you might need,” says Love.

And when it comes to daily income, creators who have come to rely on OnlyFans to pay for their housing find themselves in limbo waiting for OnlyFans to provide more clarity on their upcoming policy changes.

“It’s pretty terrifying,” Dahl said. “I bought a house [earlier this year]. So I’m sitting here going Costs. Am I going to lose my house?

Billy Procida, actor and host of The whore podcast, says OnlyFans used to cover their rent in New York. “If they say we can’t do sex acts, I don’t know if I should keep doing my OnlyFans or not,” he says. “I don’t know what kind of income I’m going to earn. “

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Amberly rothfield
Courtesy of the subject

In the meantime, there is one thing creators can do while waiting for the OnlyFans saga to end: diversify their audience and their online presence. It’s the exact same refrain that TikTok users repeated when the threat of a TikTok ban in the United States seemed imminent.

“It’s not smart as an entrepreneur to have all of your eggs in one basket,” says Amberly Rothfield, a model marketing consultant who has worked in the adult industry for over 16 years.

Love recommended that other creators create SFW websites so that clients and fans can subscribe to mailing lists and continue to search for them elsewhere if they ever had to leave OnlyFans due to the explicit ban. of content. Advocacy groups like the BIPOC collective are also running educational programs in September that will help creators adapt to the changes and expand their presence elsewhere.

“The adult industry will see it. That’s what we do well, ”says Rothfield. “We have to be because we continue to be persecuted.”

As for viewers?

“People will follow the porn. They always do, ”Jasmine says. “That’s how we got here, isn’t it?” “



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Andrew Cuomo case proves #MeToo is not enough | Catholic National Register http://www.korsanizle.com/andrew-cuomo-case-proves-metoo-is-not-enough-catholic-national-register/ Wed, 11 Aug 2021 16:51:42 +0000 http://www.korsanizle.com/andrew-cuomo-case-proves-metoo-is-not-enough-catholic-national-register/ COMMENT: The only way to free the workplace, the movie studio, the sports arena and even the Church from sexual misdeeds is to reject once and for all the toxic ideology of the sexual revolution. I feel like I wrote this column before. Yet another prominent man has fallen into public disgrace because of predatory […]]]>

COMMENT: The only way to free the workplace, the movie studio, the sports arena and even the Church from sexual misdeeds is to reject once and for all the toxic ideology of the sexual revolution.

I feel like I wrote this column before. Yet another prominent man has fallen into public disgrace because of predatory sexual behavior. This time, it was New York Governor Andrew Cuomo who resigned amid sexual harassment charges.

I wrote a version of this column about then Cardinal McCarrick and Harvey Weinstein. I wrote another version on Jeffrey Epstein, Harvey Weinstein and Theodore McCarrick. “What’s the point that you think you need to keep making?” You might ask. Just this: the #MeToo movement is not enough. Holding particularly powerful men accountable for their sexual misconduct is not enough. The only way to free the workplace, the movie studio, the sports arena and even the Church from sexual misdeeds is to reject once and for all the toxic ideology of the sexual revolution.

The New York attorney general’s office last week released a 165-page report accusing the outgoing governor “of engaging in behavior constituting sexual harassment” against at least 11 women. Debra Katz, lawyer for one of Cuomo’s accusers, said her resignation is “a testament to the growing power of women’s voices since the start of the #MeToo movement.”

I do not agree with this assessment. The #MeToo movement is weak. A few high-profile cases of publicly humiliated and punished predatory men are not enough.

Gender policy, opposing men and women according to a “feminist” scenario, is not an authentic solution to this problem either. The difficulties of proving the charges, the pain of enduring the harassment in the first place, the long-term trauma often arises as a result of sexual victimization: women shouldn’t have to endure all of this. Women suffer far more than a few successful prosecutions or indictments can fix. In addition, the purely “man against woman” “feminist” scenario cannot make sense of the many male victims of homosexual predation.

No, the real problem is the sexual revolution itself. I am going to give you a brief statement that sums up the philosophy that I believe is responsible for the sexual havoc in our lives.

Reproductive health can be defined as a state of well-being related to sexual and reproductive life. This implies that people are able to have a satisfying and safe sex life and that they have the ability to reproduce and the freedom to decide if, when and how often to do so.

“What’s wrong with this statement?” You might ask. Doesn’t everyone support “reproductive health”?

Here’s the problem: this statement and others like it never tell us who is responsible for providing everyone with a “safe and satisfying sex life” to which we are all supposedly entitled. When pressed, advocates of “reproductive health” say this applies to consenting adult partners.

But “consent” is too thin a defense against devious and manipulative behavior. The appearance of “consent” can be manipulated. This part of the #MeToo movement is deeply true. The caveat of “consent” is simply not enough to save this definition of “reproductive health”.

Who believes they really have the right to a “safe and satisfying sex life”? Who is the rapist? This idea of ​​sexual rights covers predators and disarms victims. (Come to think of it, I wrote this column before too. The poor girls whose lives were ruined on PornHub couldn’t bring themselves to criticize pornography. They wanted to be seen as “sex positive.”)

By the way, where does this definition of “reproductive health” come from? It is surely some sort of straw man argument that has been concocted in a fit of exasperated exaggeration.

I found it on the United Nations Population Fund’s FAQ page: “What is reproductive health? The original document usefully refers to paragraph 7.2 of a “United Nations Program of Action”, adopted in Cairo in 1994, and never, to my knowledge, modified on this particular point.

Behind documents like this lies the philosophy of the sexual revolution created by people like Alfred Kinsey and Wilhelm Reich. Kinsey is the author of statistical studies on sexual behavior purported to show that “everyone does it.” It was supposed to cure people of their sexual inhibitions and blockages.

Wilhelm Reich was an Austrian doctor of medicine and psychoanalysis. He wrote the book The sexual revolution in 1936. He had the idea that sexual activity was necessary for a healthy life, even for children. He taught that sexual taboos were psychologically more harmful and dangerous than any problem that unlimited sex itself could cause.

This philosophy has given us a generation of addicts and sexual predators. The #MeToo movement, like many others in the world today, would like to be against sexual predation and always remain “sex positive”. They want to accept the premise of the sexual revolution but draw a line against non-consensual and predatory sex. We have enough experience to show that this line will not hold up. The revolution creates incentives and excuses for predation. You cannot invent enough punishments after the fact to protect women, and even men, from sexual predation.

The future former Governor Cuomo is accused of having created a “toxic workplace”. But, in fact, the sexual revolution created the toxic workplace. The sexual revolution issued hunting permits to predators.

Too many men have internalized the revolutionary message that they have the right to have sex as often as they want, with whomever they choose. Until that changes, we will continue to have these issues. Shameless men will continue to prey on vulnerable women and men under their power.

This is why the #MeToo movement is not enough.


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